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Strengths and weaknesses in executive functioning in children with intellectual disability
Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
London South Bank University, London, UK.
Open University, London, UK.
Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
2012 (English)In: Research in Developmental Disabilities, ISSN 0891-4222, E-ISSN 1873-3379, Vol. 33, no 2, 600-607 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Children with intellectual disability (ID) were given a comprehensive range of executive functioning measures, which systematically varied in terms of verbal and non-verbal demands. Their performance was compared to the performance of groups matched on mental age (MA) and chronological age (CA), respectively. Twenty-two children were included in each group. Children with ID performed on par with the MA group on switching, verbal executive-loaded working memory and most fluency tasks, but below the MA group on inhibition, planning, and non-verbal executive-loaded working memory. Children with ID performed below CA comparisons on all the executive tasks. We suggest that children with ID have a specific profile of executive functioning, with MA appropriate abilities to generate new exemplars (fluency) and to switch attention between tasks, but difficulties with respect to inhibiting pre-potent responses, planning, and non-verbal executive-loaded working memory The development of different types of executive functioning skills may, to different degrees, be related to mental age and experience.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2012. Vol. 33, no 2, 600-607 p.
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-74068DOI: 10.1016/j.ridd.2011.11.004ISI: 000299403600037OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-74068DiVA: diva2:479891
Available from: 2012-01-18 Created: 2012-01-18 Last updated: 2017-12-08Bibliographically approved

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Danielsson, HenrikRönnberg, Jerker

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
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