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Noise reduction can enhance memory for heard sentences
Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
2011 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

It has been demonstrated that the benefit of signal processing intended for hearingaids is not limited to improvement in speech perception. Sarampalis et al.(2009) showed that the Ephraim-Malah noise reduction algorithm improvedcognitive performance and reduced listening effort for people with normal hearing.However, similar effects for hearing-impaired listeners have not been reported.The present study examines the effect of noise reduction in hearing aidson memory processing of speech perceived in stationary noise and competingspeech background. Twenty-six experienced hearing aid users with symmetricalsensorineural hearing loss were tested. A dual task paradigm, which consists ofa perceptual speech recognition task and a free recall memory task, was used tomeasure the cognitive outcomes with the use of binary time-frequency maskingnoise reduction technique (Wang et al., 2009). Working memory capacity wasmeasured using a reading span test. Results showed that free recall performancein the competing speech background improved with noise reduction in listenerswith better working memory capacity. No such improvement was found in thestationary noise. Listeners with better working memory also performed better inthe stationary noise than in the competing speech background. No effect of backgroundnoises or noise reduction was observed in listeners with limited workingmemory capacity. The study demonstrates that binary masking noise reductiontechnique enhances memory performance in competing speech background forpersons with good working memory capacity. In other words, working memorycapacity also predicts benefit of noise reduction signal processing.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2011.
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-74214OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-74214DiVA: diva2:481162
Conference
First International Conference on Cognitive Hearing Science for Communication. 19-22 June, 2011 in Linköping, Sweden
Available from: 2012-01-20 Created: 2012-01-20 Last updated: 2017-11-06

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Ng, Hoi Ning, ElaineRudner, MaryLunner, ThomasRönnberg, Jerker

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