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Episodic long-term memory of spoken discourse masked by speech: what is the role for working memory capacity?
Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
2012 (English)In: Journal of Speech, Language and Hearing Research, ISSN 1092-4388, E-ISSN 1558-9102, Vol. 55, no 1, 210-218 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: To investigate whether working memory capacity (WMC) modulates the effects of to-be-ignored speech on the memory of materials conveyed by to-be-attended speech.

Method: Two tasks (reading span and size-comparison span) were used to measure individual differences in WMC. Episodic long-term memory of spoken discourse was measured by requesting participants to listen to stories masked either by a normal speech or by a rotated version of that speech and subsequently answer questions on the content of the stories.

Results: Normal speech impaired performance on the episodic long-term memory test, and both WMC-tasks were negatively related to this effect, indicating that high-WMC individuals are less susceptible to disruption. Moreover, further analyses revealed that size-comparison span (a task that requires resolution of semantic confusion by inhibition processes) is a stronger predictor of the effect than reading span is.

Conclusions: Cognitive control processes support listening in adverse conditions. In particular, inhibition processes acting to resolve semantic confusion seem to underlie the relationship between WMC and susceptibility to distraction from masking speech.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, 2012. Vol. 55, no 1, 210-218 p.
Keyword [en]
wmc; speech; memory; work memory; long-term memory; memory capacity; episodic; discourse; mask; spoken; read span; semantic; what role; span; long-term;
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-74469DOI: 10.1044/1092-4388(2011/10-0353)ISI: 000301117200016OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-74469DiVA: diva2:484980
Available from: 2012-01-27 Created: 2012-01-27 Last updated: 2017-12-08Bibliographically approved

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Sörqvist, PatrikRönnberg, Jerker

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