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Blood plasma coagulation studied by surface plasmon resonance
Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
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1999 (English)In: BIOMEDICAL SENSORS, FIBERS, AND OPTICAL DELIVERY SYSTEMS, PROCEEDINGS, SPIE - International Society for Optical Engineering, 1999, Vol. 76, no 1, 107-114 p.Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

A surface plasmon resonance (SPR) apparatus was used to investigate blood plasma coagulation in real-time as a function of thromboplastin and heparin concentrations. The physical reason for the SPR signal observed is discussed and 3 different models are proposed. The response curves were analyzed by multivariable curve fitting followed by feature extraction. Interesting parameters of the sigmoid curves were lag time, slope and maximum response. When thromboplastin concentrations were increased, the lag-time decreased and the slope of the curve increased. A prolonged clotting time was mostly followed by increased maximum response, with exception for samples with no or very little thromboplastin added. High heparin concentrations changed the clotting kinetics, as seen from the lag-time vs. slope relation. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) pictures of sensor surfaces dried after completed clotting, revealed differences in fibrin network structures as a function of thromboplastin concentration, and fiber thickness increased with lower thromboplastin concentration. The results correlate well with present common methods.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
SPIE - International Society for Optical Engineering, 1999. Vol. 76, no 1, 107-114 p.
Keyword [en]
surface plasmon resonance (SPR); blood plasma coagulation; atomic force microscopy (AFM)
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-75805DOI: 10.1117/12.336920ISI: 000078785700013OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-75805DiVA: diva2:509137
Conference
Conference on Biomedical Sensors, Fibers, and Optical Delivery Systems, Stockholm, September 08-10, 1998
Available from: 2012-03-12 Created: 2012-03-12 Last updated: 2012-09-05Bibliographically approved

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Hansson, KennyBenesch, JohanJohansen, KnutLindahl, TomasLundström, IngemarTengvall, Pentti

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Hansson, KennyBenesch, JohanJohansen, KnutLindahl, TomasLundström, IngemarTengvall, Pentti
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Applied PhysicsThe Institute of TechnologyDepartment of Physics, Chemistry and BiologyDepartment of Clinical ChemistryFaculty of Health SciencesClinical Chemistry
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