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Professional Confidentiality and HIV: Duty to Warn Third Parties and its Social Implications to Public Health in Nigeria
Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Centre for Applied Ethics.
2008 (English)Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
Abstract [en]

Confidentiality is considered an integral component of medical practise, yet there has been debate within the medical community as to whether there should be exceptions to the obligation to protect patient’s confidences. In the cases involving medical patients with deadly sexually transmittable disease like HIV/AIDS, physicians feel caught between two basic principles – keeping of medical confidentiality and public safety. Bioethicists would favour breaking of confidentiality when the public safety and the life of someone are endangered. However, considering the complexities and discrimination in connection with HIV/AIDS in Nigerian context, many would be tempted to discourage the notification of partners who risk being infected, through the moral obligation of 'duty to warn', but some others would argue that not notifying people of such threat to life would only help in spreading the virus to ignorant partners of an index patient. I argued that there is an overridden utilitarian principle to save others from harm, but some others cite the negative effects the breaking of medical confidentiality would have on the healthcare system as a reason not to favour partner notification. Nevertheless, people would appreciate the value of breaching confidentiality in HIV/AIDS related cases when various forms of discrimination and stigmatisations are criminalised and policies to protect the fundamental rights of people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) are strictly adhered to.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2008. , 42 p.
Keyword [en]
confidentiality, public health, HIV
National Category
Philosophy, Ethics and Religion
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-75094ISRN: LIU-CTE-AE-EX--08/06--SEOAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-75094DiVA: diva2:510231
Subject / course
Master in Applied Ethics
Presentation
2008-06-27, Utrecht, 13:00 (English)
Uppsok
Humanities, Theology
Supervisors
Examiners
Available from: 2012-03-19 Created: 2012-02-16 Last updated: 2012-03-19Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf