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Susceptibility to symptomatic sapovirus infection in Denmark is not associated with secretor or Lewis status
Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Molecular Virology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Molecular Virology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
Department of Virology, Statens Serum Institut, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Molecular Virology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
(English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Background. Sapovirus (SaV) infections are increasing globally but there is no information available regarding factors determining susceptibility to SaV infections in the Caucasian population.

Methods. Saliva samples were collected from 64 individuals with sapovirus gastroenteritis in Denmark between October 2008 and November 2010. These were genotyped for the FUT2 G428A nonsense mutation (secretor status) and phenotyped for ABO and Lewis histo-blood groups.

Results. We found that neither secretor status nor Lewis phenotype, were associated with susceptibility to symptomatic infection with SaV. However, individuals of histo-blood groups B and AB had significantly lower risk to be infected (OR 0.18, p≤0.01 and OR 0.10, p<0.05, respectively). For 39 of the 64 SaV positive samples viral strains were genotyped and 41%, (16/39) belonged to genotype GI.2, 10% was GI.1 (4/39), 2.5% was GI.5 (1/39), 8% was GII.1 (3/39), 5% was GII.4 (2/39), 18% was GIV (7/39) and 15.5% was GV (6/39).

Conclusion. This is the first report investigating the role of host genetic factors in SaV susceptibility in the Caucasian population. We found a reduced risk of infection in individuals with blood group B (and AB), but no association to the FUT2 G428A nonsense mutation determining secretor status nor to the Lewis status.

Keyword [en]
Sapovirus, disease susceptibility, fucosyltransferase II, histo-blood group
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-76035OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-76035DiVA: diva2:511711
Available from: 2012-03-23 Created: 2012-03-23 Last updated: 2012-03-23Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Human Caliciviruses: a study of viral evolution, host genetics and disease susceptibility
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Human Caliciviruses: a study of viral evolution, host genetics and disease susceptibility
2012 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The viruses described in this thesis are the norovirus and sapoviruses, which belong to the family of human caliciviruses and are known to cause gastroenteritis in humans. Gastroenteritis has emerged as a global health problem and is based on the large number of infected considered as one of the most common diseases today. According to estimates of the World Health Organization (WHO), gastroenteritis causes over five times more pediatric deaths compared to pediatric deaths caused by HIV/AIDS worldwide. Norovirus, the cause of the famous “winter vomiting disease”, is alone responsible for more than 200 000 deaths each year in children less than 5 years of age.

The mechanism for emergence and evolution of new human calicivirus strains, as well as protective immunity in the human population is poorly understood. The main focus for this thesis was to elucidate the possible correlation between human calicivirus evolution, host genetics and disease susceptibility. One of the main findings presented in this thesis is the documentation of in vivo capsid gene evolution and quasispecies dynamics during chronic NoV GI.3 infection (Paper 1). In paper II, we reported that the G428A nonsense mutation in the FUT2 gene provides strong but not absolute protection against symptomatic GII.4 NoV infection. In my last two papers (Paper III and IV), we were the first to investigate host genetic susceptibility factors during authentic SaV infection.

To summarize, the results presented in this thesis show that the success of human calicivirus infection probably is determined by a delicate interplay between virus evolution and susceptibility of the host, both genetically and immunologically.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press, 2012. 77 p.
Series
Linköping University Medical Dissertations, ISSN 0345-0082 ; 1303
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-76036 (URN)978-91-7519-922-1 (ISBN)
Public defence
2012-04-12, Eken, Hälsouniversitetet, Campus US, Linköpings univeristet, Linköping, 09:00 (Swedish)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2012-03-23 Created: 2012-03-23 Last updated: 2012-05-07Bibliographically approved

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Carlsson, BeatriceSvensson, Lennart

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