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Long-term health consequences of violence exposure in adolescence: A 26–year prospective study
Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
Department of Health Policy, Management and Behavior, University at Albany, SUNY, Albany, NY, USA.
Department of Clinical Sciences, Obstetrics and Gynecology, Umeå University, Umeå.
2012 (English)In: BMC Public Health, ISSN 1471-2458, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 12, no 411Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Violence victimization represents a serious risk factor for health related symptoms, for both men and women. The aim of this study was to evaluate the long-term effects of violence exposure in late adolescence and early adulthood on adult health, physical as well as mental, using a long-term prospective population-based study, with a follow up of 9, 19, and 26 years.

Methods: The primary data source is a longitudinal panel from one of the longest running social science surveys in the world, the Swedish Level-of-Living surveys (LNU). We analyzed three cohorts, individuals aged 15-19 in 1974 and 1981, and individuals aged 18-19 in 1991 which were followed up 2000. Structured interviews on childhood, family relationships, life-events, living conditions, health history and status, working conditions, behavioral, psychosocial, and demographic variables were repeatedly used in all cohorts.

Results: Multivariate models of violence exposures in adolescence in the 1974-91 cohorts as predictors of adult health in 2000 are reported for both men and women. Women exposed to violence had raised odds ratios for ill health, measured as heavy illness burden, and poor self rated health, after controlling for possible confounders. No such associations were found for men.

Conclusions: This study’s findings provide additional empirical support for the importance of policies and practices to identify and prevent violence exposure in adolescence and young adulthood and to supply treatments for adolescence exposed to violence and above all the young women.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2012. Vol. 12, no 411
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-77043DOI: 10.1186/1471-2458-12-411ISI: 000307900500001OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-77043DiVA: diva2:524710
Available from: 2012-05-03 Created: 2012-05-03 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Violence through the life cycle: A public health problem
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Violence through the life cycle: A public health problem
2012 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Background: Violence has probably always been part of the human experience. Its impact can be seen, in various forms, in all parts of the world. In 1996, WHO:s Forty-Ninth World Health Assembly adopted a resolution , declaring violence a major and growing public health problem around the world. Public health work centers around health promotion and disease prevention activities in the population and public health is an expression of the health status of the population taking into account both the level and the distribution of health. Exposure to violence can have many aspects, differing throughout the life course — deprivation of autonomy, financial exploitation, psychological and physical neglect or abuse — but all types share common characteristics: the use of destructive force to control others by depriving them of safety, freedom, health and, in too many instances, life; the epidemic proportions of the problem, particularly among vulnerable groups; a devastating impact on individuals, families, neighborhoods, communities, and society.

Methods: Three different data sources were used in the four articles, three cross-sectional studies (“Life and Health in Norrland” and “Health on Equal Terms 2004 and 2006”) and one longitudinal (“Level-of-Living Survey”).

Results: We present an important picture of the strong association between exposure to violence and ill health through the life cycle. A population-based study showed an increased risk of poorer physical and psychological health among boys and girls aged 0-18, as reported by their mothers exposed to violence. Further, a strong association between those exposed to violence and physical and mental ill health was demonstrated in young adults aged 18-25, also after adjusting for possible confounders, specifically for women. Even in an elder group aged 65-84, representative results showed an extensive negative health outcome panorama caused by fear of crime and exposure to abuse both in elderly men and women. Lastly, in trying to provide additional empirical support for the association between exposure to violence and ill health the prospective study demonstrated that violence exposure in adolescence and young adulthood presented a negative association to severe illness burden in adulthood for women but not men.

Conclusion: Exposure to violence among both men and women is an important risk factor for ill health and should receive greater attention in public health work. A strong association between violence and various health outcomes was demonstrated in different time periods through the life cycle.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press, 2012. 84 p.
Series
Linköping University Medical Dissertations, ISSN 0345-0082 ; 1307
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-77044 (URN)978-91-7519-905-4 (ISBN)
Public defence
2012-06-07, Aulan, Hälsans hus, Campus US, Linköpings universitet, Linköping, 13:00 (English)
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Supervisors
Available from: 2012-05-03 Created: 2012-05-03 Last updated: 2012-05-03Bibliographically approved

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Olofsson, NiclasLindqvist, Kent

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