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The practice architectures for becoming a forensic expert
Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Studies in Adult, Popular and Higher Education. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Studies in Adult, Popular and Higher Education. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
2012 (English)In: ProPEL International Conference. Professions and Professional Learning in Troubling Times: Emergin Practices and Transgressive Knowledge / [ed] Tara Fenwick, 2012Conference paper, Published paper (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The profession of a forensic expert is a narrow professional area and the professional knowledge is specialized with high quality demands from the judicial system. The common way to become a forensic expert is through higher education. However, to become a professional forensic expert in Sweden the only formal way is the internal training program at the Swedish National Laboratory of Forensic Science (SKL). The aim of this paper is to investigate the professional learning of forensic experts in such conditions, based on the findings from an ethnographical study of five forensic trainees’ and their supervisors’ participations in the program. Specifically, the paper investigates how the internal training program within SKL, i.e. forensic specific introductory courses and learning integrated in everyday work, is arranged in order for forensic expert trainees’ to learn the professional practice and become professional. By drawing on practice theory (Schatzki, 2002; Kemmis, e.g. 2009) we view the internal training program as practice architectures for learning the professional practice in terms of special arrangements of activities and relations within the professional practice of forensics. With this viewpoint it has been possible to explore how the different mediated preconditions, i.e. discursive, economical, material and social arrangements of the specific professional forensic practices prefigure the possibilities and constraints for developing a new professional practitioner, i.e. forensic expert. Thu, a central finding is that despite the institutional intention of common architectures for a training program the culturally and discursive “sayings”, “doings” and “relatings” in the specific professional practices shape different learning practices. This is presented in a model of arrangements for work and social connections for learning.  It is also shown that becoming a forensic expert is fully entangled with a material practice such as technologies, tools and machines.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2012.
National Category
Pedagogy
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-78040OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-78040DiVA: diva2:530927
Conference
ProPEL International Conference. Professions and Professional Learning in Troubling Times, May 9th-11th, 2012, Stirling UK
Available from: 2012-06-05 Created: 2012-06-05 Last updated: 2012-06-12

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Nyström, SofiaKöpsén, Susanne

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf