liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Controlled Growth of ZnO Nanowires on Graphene surface
Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
Show others and affiliations
(English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Graphene, a perfect two-dimensional (2D) and completely p-conjugated honeycomb network of carbon, can potentially be a platform to serve as a substrate for growth of semiconductor nanostructures. High quality graphene films are prepared by sublimation on semiinsulating SiC grown by high temperature chemical vapor deposition (HTCVD) and on SiO2 by wet chemistry routine. Selective growth of ZnO nanowires (NWs) is performed on the graphene surface by the hydrothermal method. Mechanical stability of the graphene-ZnO heterojunction is tested by a utilizing a very simple technique. 1D ZnO NWs exhibit strong binding with 2D graphene surface and the NWs grown on graphene are of high crystal quality. This result can be very important for realizing the ultimate goal of 3D assembly at the nanoscale. The electrical contact between graphene and ZnO was analyzed by current vs. voltage (I-V) characteristics. The graphene-ZnO junction behaved as a typical metal-semiconductor ohmic contact lacking a contact barrier. These combined graphene-ZnO 3D heterojunction can pave the way for the next-generation of nano and optoelectronic devices.

National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-78675OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-78675DiVA: diva2:534699
Available from: 2012-06-18 Created: 2012-06-18 Last updated: 2014-01-15Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Graphene and ZnO Nanostructures for Nano- Optoelectronic & Biosensing Applications
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Graphene and ZnO Nanostructures for Nano- Optoelectronic & Biosensing Applications
2012 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

There has been a remarkable excitement in graphene research since the famous discovery in 2004 by isolating a monolayer with the help of scotch tape. Graphene, merely a single layer of carbon atoms, is progressively making inroads into a wide range of applications, from ballistic electronics to biosensors to flexible/transparent displays. Graphene is a matchless material that is strong, light, transparent, and an excellent conductor of heat and electricity. On the other hand, zinc oxide (ZnO) is a wide band semiconductor that demonstrates excellent electrical, optical, catalytic and sensing properties and has numerous applications in various fields. ZnO is a natural n-type semiconductor due to the presence of intrinsic defects such as Zn interstitials and O vacancies that also contribute strongly to optical emissions in the visible region.

The amalgamation of the exceptional properties of graphene with good semiconducting properties of ZnO can pave the way towards the realization of future devices (LED, biosensors, photovoltaics etc.).

In this thesis, graphene nanosheets and zinc oxide (ZnO) nanostructures have beensuccessfully synthesized by using chemical vapor deposition (CVD), vapor liquidsolid (VLS) or wet chemistry routines. These nanostructures were used to fabricatenano and optoelectronic devices, including field effect transistors (FETs), lightemitting diodes (LEDs), UV detectors and biosensors. Both nanomaterial’s propertiesand performances of the devices have been characterized and reported.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press, 2012. 80 p.
Series
Linköping Studies in Science and Technology. Dissertations, ISSN 0345-7524 ; 1458
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-78697 (URN)978-91-7519-869-9 (ISBN)
Public defence
2012-05-29, K3, Kåkenhus, Campus Norrköping, Linköpings universitet, Norrköping, 10:15 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2012-06-18 Created: 2012-06-18 Last updated: 2014-01-15Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Authority records BETA

ul Hasan, KamranMagnusson, BjörnJanzén, ErikNur, OmerWillander, Magnus

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
ul Hasan, KamranMagnusson, BjörnJanzén, ErikNur, OmerWillander, Magnus
By organisation
Department of Science and TechnologyThe Institute of TechnologySemiconductor MaterialsPhysics and Electronics
Natural Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

urn-nbn

Altmetric score

urn-nbn
Total: 548 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf