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Simulation of the Manufacturing Process of Sheet Metal Assemblies
Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Solid Mechanics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
2012 (English)Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The increased complexity of products and narrow lead times for product development have intensified the use of virtual prototyping, also called simulation-based design. The simulation of each individual manufacturing process is an important part of product development, However it is also necessary to study the complete sequences of manufacturing processes. By studying the complete sequence, the properties of the entire manufacturing process and the final product can be evaluated. The quality of the results from each individual process simulation is improved by supplying initial conditions that closer match the reality. Thus, greater benefits can be gained from using simulation as a tool within process and product development.

In this thesis the manufacturing process chain of a sheet metal assembly is studied. A methodology of sequentially simulating each step in the manufacturing process of the assembly is proposed. Each step of the proposed methodology is described, and a validation of the prediction capabilities is performed by comparisons with results from a physically manufactured assembly. Furthermore a simulation based sensitivity study is performed in order to investigate the influence of the forming history on the predictions of the assembly properties. In the study, several simulations of the assembly stage are performed in which different types of forming histories are retained from the forming stage.

This study demonstrates that it is possible to predict the final shape of an assembled structure by using virtual prototyping. It is found that the most influential factor from the forming stage is the residual stress state. Especially for components with a more complex geometry in which large residual stresses can be retained. It is also shown that it is important for the quality of the prediction to retain as much information as possible from the previous manufacturing steps. The proposed simulation procedure is a useful tool during product development phases in order to evaluate the properties of both the manufacturing processes and of the final assembly.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press, 2012. , 41 p.
Series
Linköping Studies in Science and Technology. Thesis, ISSN 0280-7971 ; 1532
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-78770Local ID: LIU-TEK-LIC-2012:17ISBN: 978-91-7519-877-4 (print)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-78770DiVA: diva2:535665
Presentation
2012-06-15, Sal A35, Hus A, Campus Valla, Linköpings universitet, Linköping, 10:15 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2012-06-20 Created: 2012-06-20 Last updated: 2012-06-20Bibliographically approved
List of papers
1. Finite element simulation of the manufacturing process chain of a sheet metal assembly
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Finite element simulation of the manufacturing process chain of a sheet metal assembly
2012 (English)In: Journal of Materials Processing Technology, ISSN 0924-0136, E-ISSN 1873-4774, Vol. 212, no 7, 1453-1462 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

An increasing number of components in automotive structures are today made from advanced high strength steel (AHSS). Since AHSS demonstrates more severe springback behaviour than ordinary mild steels, it requires more efforts to meet the design specification of the stamped parts. Consequently, the physical fine tuning of the die design and the stamping process can be time consuming. The trial-and-error development process may be shortened by replacing most of the physical try-outs with finite element (FE) simulations of the forming process, including the springback behaviour. Still it can be hard to identify when a stamped part will lead to an acceptable assembly with respect to the geometry and the residual stress state. In part since the assembling process itself will distort the components. To resolve this matter it is here proposed to extend the FE-simulation of the stamping process, to also include the first level sub-assembly stage. In this study a methodology of sequentially simulating each step in the manufacturing process of an assembly is proposed. Each step of the proposed methodology is described, and a validation of the prediction capabilities is performed by comparing with a physically manufactured assembly. The assembly is composed of three sheet metal components made from DP600 steel which are joined by spot welding. The components are designed to exhibit severe springback behaviour in order to put both the forming and subsequent assembling simulations to the test. The work presented here demonstrates that by using virtual prototyping it is possible to predict the final shape of an assembled structure.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2012
Keyword
Finite element simulation, Assembly, Sheet metal, Forming, Springback
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-77853 (URN)10.1016/j.jmatprotec.2012.02.012 (DOI)000304020800001 ()
Note

Funding Agencies|Swedish foundation for strategic research||ProViking programme||

Available from: 2012-05-31 Created: 2012-05-31 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
2. The effects of forming history on sheet metal assembly
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The effects of forming history on sheet metal assembly
2014 (English)In: International Journal of Material Forming, ISSN 1960-6206, E-ISSN 1960-6214, Vol. 7, no 3, 305-316 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

As demand for faster product development increases, physical prototypes are replaced by virtual prototypes. By using finite element simulations to evaluate the functional behaviour of the product as well as its manufacturing process, more design alternatives can be evaluated while a considerably smaller number of physical prototypes are needed. As sheet metal assemblies are common in a wide range of products, reliable methods for predicting their properties are necessary. By sequentially simulating the complete manufacturing process chain of an assembly, early predictions concerning the geometry and material properties of the assembly can be made.

In this study a simulation-based sensitivity study is performed in order to investigate the influence of the forming history on the predictions of assembly properties. In the study, several simulations of the assembly stage are performed in which different types of forming histories are retained from the forming stage. The simulations of the assembly stage will range from a case with linear elastic conditions without forming history, to a case with the full forming history state and consistent material modelling throughout all simulations. It is found that the residual stress state is the most influential history variable from the forming stage. Especially for more complex geometries in which large residual stresses can be retained.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2014
Keyword
Finite element simulation, Assembly, Sheet metal, Forming, History variables, Chaining of manufacturing processes
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-78765 (URN)10.1007/s12289-013-1128-9 (DOI)000338323600004 ()
Note

On the day of the defence date of the Ph.D. thesis the status of this article was Manuscript.

Available from: 2012-06-20 Created: 2012-06-20 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved

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