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Circulating cat allergen and immune complexes in cat- allergic children
Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
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1998 (English)In: Clinical and Experimental Allergy, ISSN 0954-7894, E-ISSN 1365-2222, Vol. 28, no 10, 1258-1263 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background

The first encounters with allergens seem to influence the development of allergy. Food antigens have been detected in sera as free antigens and in complexes with IgG but less is known about the presence of inhalant allergens.

Objective

To investigate the presence of the major cat allergen Fel d 1, either as free allergen and/or in complexes with IgG and IgE antibodies in sera from atopic children.

Methods

Serum samples from 33 cat allergic asthmatic children, 7–17 years old, and 15 non-allergic controls were investigated for the presence of Fel d 1 by ELISA (detection limit 0.13 μg/L). To detect immune complexes (IC), the IgG fraction from Fel d 1 positive sera was purified by affinity chromatography. Purified and non-absorbed material was then analysed for allergen content and specific IgG antibody levels. Immune complexes with Fel d 1 IgE were detected by coupling anti-Fel d 1 MoAb to paramagnetic particles.

Results

Fel d 1 was detected (0.15–1.8 μg/L) in 23 of the 33 patients (70%) but not from any of the controls. Eighteen samples contained IgE-Fel d 1 IC and two of four tested samples contained Fel d 1 in the IgG fraction. Electrophoresis and Western blotting of IgG purified material using anti-Fel d 1 MoAb corroborated the presence of IgG-Fel d 1 IC.

Conclusion

Free-circulating inhalant allergen and IC with allergens may contribute to maintaining immune responsiveness and sensitivity.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
1998. Vol. 28, no 10, 1258-1263 p.
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-80093DOI: 10.1046/j.1365-2222.1998.00384.xOAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-80093DiVA: diva2:545554
Available from: 2012-08-20 Created: 2012-08-20 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Transfer of humoral immunity from the mother to her off-spring
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Transfer of humoral immunity from the mother to her off-spring
2001 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Background. It has been established that T cell responses of foetal origin to inhalant allergens are present in most cord blood samples. These immune responses could possibly be explained by transplacental passage of peptides, either as free antigens or in complexes with IgG, providing the foetus with a trigger for the priming of the T cell system already in utero. Antibodies to food antigens to which the mother is commonly exposed are present in the milk, but their relationship to allergy is unknown. IgA antibodies to inhalant allergens have not been previously detected in human milk.

Objective. The aim of this thesis was to explore whether inhaled allergens in serum and IgA antibodies in breast milk could contribute to the allergic immune responses to allergens in the children.

Methods. The presence of cat allergen Fel d 1 was analysed by ELISA in serum samples from cat allergic asthmatic children. To detect IgG immune complexes (IC), affmity chromatography purification and Western blotting were performed. Iri:nnune complexes with Fel d 1-IgE were detected by a modification of MagicLite, and their specificity was assessed by different approaches. Serum samples from allergic and non-allergic mothers, and cord blood from their infants, were measured for the presence of Fel d 1-IgG immune complexes by an amplified ELISA. Cord blood mononuclear cells (CBMC) of babies from allergic and non-allergic mothers were stimulated with cat allergen and the production of IFN-γ, IL-5, IL-10 and IL-13 was determined by ELISA and the levels related to the presence of IC. Furthermore, IgG1 and IgG4 antibodies to cat were measured by ELISA. Colostrum and samples of mature milk from allergic and non-allergic mothers were analysed for IgA antibodies to cat, P-lactoblobulin (BLG) and ovalbumin (OVA) by an amplified ELISA.

Results. The cat allergen Fel d I was detected in 70% of sera from cat allergic chilch'en, but not in any of the controls. The allergen was present in complexes with IgE and IgG antibodies as corroborated by different approaches. Immune complexes with IgG were detected in sera from allergic and non-allergic mothers, as well as in the cord blood from their babies, but neither the prevalence nor the levels of complexes were related to maternal allergy. This was also the case for IgG antibodies to cat. The production of IL-5, IL-10, IL-13 and IFN-γ by CBMC was not influenced by maternal atopy. Interferon-y secretion by CBMC after stimulation with cat allergen, however, was less conunonly detected in samples with immune complexes. Secretory IgA to cat and OVA allergens were frequently detected in colostrum and mature milk, while antibodies to BLG were less common. The antibody levels to cat and BLG were similar in allergic and non-allergic mothers.

Conclusion. The presence of IC with allergens may contribute to maintaining immune responsiveness and sensitivity in allergic individuals. Low levels of transplacentally transferred IC can conceivable provide the foetus with the signal for priming ofT cell responses to inhalant allergens. This seems to be a nonnal mechanism, as the immune responses are not related to maternal allergy. Low level exposure of the maternal mucosa, e.g. by inhalant allergens, can induce IgA antibody secretion in breast milk, but this mechanism is not related with any protective effect against allergy.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Linköping: Linköpings universitet, 2001. 111 p.
Series
Linköping University Medical Dissertations, ISSN 0345-0082 ; 692
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-28554 (URN)13707 (Local ID)91-7219-984-9 (ISBN)13707 (Archive number)13707 (OAI)
Public defence
2001-10-19, Berzeliussalen, Universitetssjukhuset, Linköping, 13:00 (Swedish)
Opponent
Available from: 2009-10-09 Created: 2009-10-09 Last updated: 2012-08-21Bibliographically approved

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