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A Sexual Ornament in Chickens Is Affected bu Pleiotropic Alleles at HAO1 and BMP2, Selected during Domestication
Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. (AVIAN)ORCID iD: 0000-0003-1262-4585
Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. (AVIAN)
Department of Medical Biochemistry and Michrobiology, BMC, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsalam, Sweden. (The Research group of Autoimmunity, Akademiska Sjukhuset)
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2012 (English)In: PLOS Genetics, ISSN 1553-7390, Vol. 8, no 8, e10002914- p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Domestication is one of the strongest forms of short-term, directional selection. Although selection is typically only exerted on one or a few target traits, domestication can lead to numerous changes in many seemingly unrelated phenotypes. It is unknown whether such correlated responses are due to pleiotropy or linkage between separate genetic architectures. Using three separate intercrosses between wild and domestic chickens, a locus affecting comb mass (a sexual ornament in the chicken) and several fitness traits (primarily medullary bone allocation and fecundity) was identified. This locus contains two tightly-linked genes, BMP2 and HAO1, which together produce the range of pleiotropic effects seen. This study demonstrates the importance of pleiotropy (or extremely close linkage) in domestication. The nature of this pleiotropy also provides insights into how this sexual ornament could be maintained in wild populations.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2012. Vol. 8, no 8, e10002914- p.
National Category
Natural Sciences
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-80901DOI: 10.1371/journal.pgen.1002914ISI: 000308529300066OAI: diva2:549033

funding agencies|Foundation for Strategic Environmental Research||Swedish Research Council for Environmental, Agricultural Sciences, and Spatial Planning||FORMAS (Swedish Environment, Agricultural Sciences and Spatial Planning)||VR (Swedish Research Council)||

Available from: 2012-09-03 Created: 2012-09-03 Last updated: 2015-11-02
In thesis
1. Genomics of chicken domestication and feralisation
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Genomics of chicken domestication and feralisation
2015 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Domestication can serve as a study system of rapid evolutionary change with wide-ranging effects on traits in animals. The chicken was domesticated from the Red Junglefowl and has diverged in behaviour, morphology and life history traits. Conversely, feralisation is a more recent process when domestic animals are again exposed and respond to an environment outside of human husbandry. Linkage-based quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping has been used to localise genetic variants that affect domestication traits in the chicken genome. Because of the limited resolution of linkage mapping, the QTL regions associated with domestication traits are often broad and contain many genes. One approach to help sort out potential causative genes is to measure gene expression as an intermediary molecular phenotype. In this dissertation, expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) mapping of gene expression traits is used to search for potential causative genes for domestication traits in the chicken. Expression quantitative trait loci were mapped across the whole genome in bone and hypothalamus samples, and targeted at QTL regions in the base of the comb. These studies have resulted in candidate quantitative trait genes, supported by genetic and gene expression evidence, for relative comb mass, bone allocation, egg production and fearful behaviour as measured in an open field test. Secondly, a population genomics approach was used to study the molecular basis of feralisation in a free-range feral chicken population from the Pacific island of Kauai. Mitochondrial DNA sequences and phenotypic observations establish the hybrid origin of this population as a mixture of wild and domestic chickens. Genome-wide mapping of pooled heterozygosity highlight regions that may be involved in adaptation to the feral environment. The expression QTL results bring us closer to knowledge about the molecular basis of domestication traits in the chicken, suggesting plausible candidate genes and opening up for functional studies of individual loci. The population genomic study shows that feralisation has a mostly different genomic architecture than domestication, and suggests phenotypic effects, based on overlap with domestication QTL regions, for some of the identified regions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press, 2015. 28 p.
Linköping Studies in Science and Technology. Dissertations, ISSN 0345-7524 ; 1708
National Category
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-122280 (URN)10.3384/diss.diva-122280 (DOI)978-91-7685-932-2 (Print) (ISBN)
Public defence
2015-12-18, Planck, Fysikhuset, Campus Valla, Linköping, 10:15 (English)
Available from: 2015-11-02 Created: 2015-10-27 Last updated: 2015-11-05Bibliographically approved

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