liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Intra- and inter-tester reliability and reference values for isometric neck strength
Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-6075-4432
Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
2001 (English)In: Physiotherapy Research International, ISSN 1358-2267, E-ISSN 1471-2865, Vol. 6, no 1, 15-26 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Age- and sex-specific reference values for neck strength based on reliable measurements in the upright position are lacking. The aim of the present study was to determine intra- and inter-tester reliability and age- and sex-specific reference values for isometric neck strength in extension, flexion and lateral flexion in sitting position measured with the David Back Clinic 140 (DBC 140) equipment.

METHOD: The reliability of the DBC 140 equipment was investigated in 30 healthy volunteers and reference values were obtained from 101 healthy men and women.

RESULTS: The reliability study showed that neck strength measured with the DBC 140 equipment has almost perfect intra- and inter-tester reliability (ICC values between 0.85 and 0.97). The mean value of the first in a series of three measurements was the highest for all three test leaders and for almost all directions. Results from the reference value study showed that gender is a much more important determinant of neck strength than age, body weight or body mass index (BMI). Neck strength in women was, on average, 55% of that in men, and when adjusted for body weight or BMI, the percentages were 70% and 59%, respectively. In all directions observed, neck strength decreased by approximately 20% from age 25 to 64 years.

CONCLUSIONS: Measurements of neck strength taken in upright position with the DBC 140 equipment have almost perfect intra- and inter-tester reliability and justify the use of this test procedure. The use of the first measurement in a test series can be recommended for use in clinical practice since it was shown to be the maximal test value and thus, had a very low intra-tester difference. The use of reference values for neck strength when evaluating patients with neck disorders needs to take gender into account.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2001. Vol. 6, no 1, 15-26 p.
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-81290DOI: 10.1002/pri.210OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-81290DiVA: diva2:551425
Available from: 2012-09-11 Created: 2012-09-11 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Functional analysis of the cervical spine: Reliability, reference data and outcome after anterior cervical decompression and fusion
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Functional analysis of the cervical spine: Reliability, reference data and outcome after anterior cervical decompression and fusion
2002 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The aim of the thesis was to investigate the reliability of the test procedure, and to obtain reference values for active range of motion (AROM) of the neck, neck-, and hand strength. Another aim was to perform a broad assessment of outcome in patients with cervical disc disease operated on by anterior cervical decompression and fusion (ACDF) and to identify predictive factors for a good outcome. For a broad assessment it is important to have reliable objective and subjective variables, and reference values obtained in healthy people.

Three studies concern reliability and reference values for neck AROM, neck strength, and hand strength of healthy individuals. One study concerns the outcome of 34 consecutively included patients six months and one year after ACDF, and any remaining deficits afterwards. One study is a prospective randomised study of 103 patients concerning prognostic factors (mean follow-up 19 months, SD 6, range 12-24 months) for a good outcome of ACDF, and any remaining deficits afterwards.

The intra-, and inter-tester reliability of neck AROM, neck strength, and hand strength obtained from 30-32 healthy volunteers were considered substantial to almost perfect (ICC-values 0.61-0.98) and can be used for comparisons between or within groups. The reference values obtained in 101 asymptomatic men and women aged 25-64 years showed that age was the most important factor to take into consideration when measuring neck AROM, and gender was most important for neck and hand strength measurements. The patients showed benefits from ACDF at the one-year follow-up in neck strength in lateral flexion, neck muscle endurance in flexion, pain, numbness, ADL, Neck Disability Index (NDI), sick leave, change in general health, and symptom satisfaction. Except for a deterioration in general health there were no significant differences between the six-month and the one-year followup. The most important predictor for low postoperative pain intensity was greater preoperative kyphosis.

The predictive value of segmental kyphosis is noteworthy and of potential clinical interest. Low preoperative pain intensity was the most important predictor for improved NDI. Non-smoking males with a greater segmental kyphosis at the level of surgical intervention, with less severe pain experience and better initial function, had the best prognosis for a successful outcome of ACDF. Although the patients experienced benefits from surgery in many of the variables, a large number still had remaining deficits. These studies support the need for improvements in the selection for and the treatment techniques in both surgery and physiotherapy in degenerative cervical disorders.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Linköping: Linköpings universitet, 2002. 84 p.
Series
Linköping University Medical Dissertations, ISSN 0345-0082 ; 738
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-26343 (URN)10867 (Local ID)91-7373-182-X (ISBN)10867 (Archive number)10867 (OAI)
Public defence
2002-09-06, Berzeliussalen, Universitetssjukhuset, Linköping, 09:00 (Swedish)
Opponent
Available from: 2009-10-08 Created: 2009-10-08 Last updated: 2013-09-03Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full text

Authority records BETA

Peolsson, AnneliÖberg, Birgitta

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Peolsson, AnneliÖberg, Birgitta
By organisation
Division of PhysiotherapyFaculty of Health Sciences
In the same journal
Physiotherapy Research International
Medical and Health Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 361 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf