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When is it appropriate to address patients alcohol consumption in health care-national survey of views of the general population in Sweden
Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics.
Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Health Care in Linköping.
University of London London School Hyg and Trop Med, England .
Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Work and Rehabilitation. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-0279-5903
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2012 (English)In: Addictive Behaviours, ISSN 0306-4603, E-ISSN 1873-6327, Vol. 37, no 11, 1211-1216 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of this study was to investigate the Swedish populations beliefs and attitudes on when it is appropriate to address patients alcohol in health care services and to identify the characteristics of those who are most supportive of this alcohol-preventive work. A cross-sectional study of 5981 nationally representative individuals (18-64 years) was done using confidential mail questionnaires. Alcohol consumption was assessed with AUDIT-C and respondents were classified into four levels of drinking status. Sociodemographic data were also collected. Thirty-four percent completely agreed that health care providers should routinely ask patients about their alcohol habits and 33% completely agreed that providers should ask but only if patients have consulted them with alcohol-related symptoms. There was limited support for a statement that alcohol conversations should be premised on the patient bringing up the issue and even less support for the notion that alcohol habits are peoples own business and not something that health care providers should address. Thirty-four percent believed that people did not answer honestly when asked about their alcohol habits in health care. There appears to be considerable support in the general population for alcohol prevention in Swedish health care services that involves questions being asked routinely about alcohol. This should be helpful in ongoing efforts to improve the implementation of alcohol screening and brief interventions in Sweden. Further studies on the views of hazardous and excessive drinkers appear particularly important.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier , 2012. Vol. 37, no 11, 1211-1216 p.
Keyword [en]
Alcohol, Hazardous drinking, Brief intervention, Prevention, Health care system, Screening
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-84329DOI: 10.1016/j.addbeh.2012.05.024ISI: 000307908400004OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-84329DiVA: diva2:558931
Note

Funding Agencies|Swedish National Public Health Institute||

Available from: 2012-10-05 Created: 2012-10-05 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved

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Nilsen, PerBendtsen, PrebenKarlsson, NadineDalal, Koustuv

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Nilsen, PerBendtsen, PrebenKarlsson, NadineDalal, Koustuv
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Social Medicine and Public Health ScienceFaculty of Health SciencesHealth Technology Assessment and Health EconomicsDepartment of Acute Health Care in LinköpingWork and RehabilitationDivision of Community Medicine
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Addictive Behaviours
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