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Who brings dengue into North Queensland? A descriptive, exploratory study
Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
James Cook University, Australia .
Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
James Cook University, Australia .
2012 (English)In: The Australian journal of rural health, ISSN 1038-5282, E-ISSN 1440-1584, Vol. 20, no 3, 150-155 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: To describe the demographics, patterns of assessment and treatment of people visiting a regional emergency department with potential diagnoses of malaria or dengue fever. Design: To identify potential dengue fever cases, we used an indicator of recent overseas travel and fever that is a request for malaria testing. A chart audit of 301 medical records of people between 2008 and 2010 was conducted to describe patient characteristics, diagnostic tests performed and treatment. Setting: A regional hospital located in the wet tropics. Results: Malaria testing was most often performed on Australian citizens (64.1%), medical evacuees (20.3%) and tourists (18.6%). Overall, 49.8% of patients tested for malaria did not also have a dengue test, despite being indicated in 54% of this group. People tested for malaria usually lived in a residential house or unit (69.7%). Only 9% were staying in hotels and hostels. Oceania was the most commonly visited region in the two weeks prior to presentation. Malaria was diagnosed in 17.3% and dengue fever in 12% of patients tested. Patients with dengue fever were more likely than patients with malaria to self-refer to hospital, be staying in commercial accommodation and to have recently travelled to Southeast Asia. Conclusion: Both dengue fever and malaria occur predominantly in residents who reside in non-commercial accommodation. Efforts to identify imported dengue fever cases should focus on both tourists and local residents returning from overseas countries.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell , 2012. Vol. 20, no 3, 150-155 p.
Keyword [en]
tropical medicine; dengue; malaria; rural health service; regional medical program
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-86563DOI: 10.1111/j.1440-1584.2012.01272.xISI: 000304390300010OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-86563DiVA: diva2:579058
Available from: 2012-12-19 Created: 2012-12-19 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
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  • Other style
More styles
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  • de-DE
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