liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Development policies as a vehicle for addressing climate change
Stockholm Environm Institute, Sweden.
Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
Finnish Environm Institute, Finland.
2012 (English)In: Climate and Development, ISSN 1756-5529, E-ISSN 1756-5537, Vol. 4, no 3, 251-260 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article summarizes the findings of an international research effort, presented in this Special Issue, intended to identify the opportunities and challenges in creating institutional arrangements that could lock in, and exploit, a dynamic in which development policies alter socio-technical systems and indirectly promote various climate activities. In doing so, it also introduces and assesses intervention theory as a novel approach to analyse the link between international institutions and national policies. The conclusions are based on an analysis of Sustainable Development Policies and Measures (SD-PAM), a precursor to National Appropriate Mitigation Action, a suggested mechanism in the current climate negotiations, built around a set of national case studies in Brazil, China and Mozambique, covering a diverse set of sectors biofuels, bioenergy, agriculture and transportation. The article concludes that a mechanism like SD-PAM could play a vital role in promoting the changes in socio-technical systems necessary to meet the 2 degrees C target defined as a precondition to avoid dangerous climate change. Most critically, it constitutes a means to provide recognition for national activities that are otherwise not viewed as climate policies. This could in turn generate (1) new commitments; (2) additional direct funding; (3) indirect financing in the form of tradable permits; and (4) different forms of technology transfer.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Earthscan / Taylor and Francis: STM, Behavioural Science and Public Health Titles , 2012. Vol. 4, no 3, 251-260 p.
Keyword [en]
SD-PAM; side effects; framing; policy integration; socio-technical systems; intervention theory; value-chain; development; climate change
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-87554DOI: 10.1080/17565529.2012.698590ISI: 000311943000009OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-87554DiVA: diva2:589594
Available from: 2013-01-18 Created: 2013-01-18 Last updated: 2017-12-06

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full text

Authority records BETA

Linnér, Björn-Ola

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Linnér, Björn-Ola
By organisation
Centre for Climate Science and Policy ResearchDepartment of Water and Environmental StudiesFaculty of Arts and Sciences
In the same journal
Climate and Development
Social Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 57 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf