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Artificial 'olfactory' images from a chemical sensor using a light-pulse technique
Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
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1991 (English)In: Nature, ISSN 0028-0836, E-ISSN 1476-4687, Vol. 352, no 6330, 47-50 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

THERE is much interest in the use of chemical sensor arrays, in conjunction with pattern-recognition routines, for developing artificial olfactory devices-electronic noses-which can characterize the chemical composition of gas mixtures 1-5. Here we describe a technique that uses a continuous sensing surface and a detection method involving a scanning pulsed light source, to generate images that represent a fingerprint of the gases detected. The detector is a large-area field-effect device with a number of different catalytic metals constituting the detecting surface (the devices active gate) 6,7. A pulsed light beam scanned across this surface generates a photocapacitive current that varies with the value of the surface potential 8,9. A continuous sensing surface of this type provides information that would require an array of hundreds of discrete sensors. The technique also provides a new means of studying the coupling between the electronic properties of catalytic metals and chemical reactions taking place on their surfaces.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Nature Publishing Group , 1991. Vol. 352, no 6330, 47-50 p.
National Category
Engineering and Technology
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URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-88155DOI: 10.1038/352047a0ISI: A1991FV17800064OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-88155DiVA: diva2:602814
Available from: 2013-02-04 Created: 2013-01-30 Last updated: 2017-12-06

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Lundström, IngemarErlandsson, RagnarFrykman, UlfSpetz, AnitaSundgren, HansWelin, StefanWinquist, Fredrik

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Lundström, IngemarErlandsson, RagnarFrykman, UlfSpetz, AnitaSundgren, HansWelin, StefanWinquist, Fredrik
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