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Myocordial segmentation of time-resolved 3D phase-contrast MRI
Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-1395-8296
Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
(English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Time-resolved three-dimensional (3D) phase-contrast MRI can be used to study 3D cardiac blood flow patterns and myocardial motion. The image contrast between myocardium and blood in 3D MRl is often inadequate for clear orientation and border delineation, however. To improve the accuracy and ease of segmentation, we developed a method based on a particle trace technique for time-resolved 3D cardiac velocity vector fields. A particle trace trajectory that follows the blood flow and the myocardial motion is obtained by integration of the velocity field over time. The myocardium can be differentiated by using the magnitude image data in combination with the trajectory's velocities and the expected behavior of the myocardial particle traces, that is, that traces starting in the myocardium will return to their starting point at the end of a cardiac cycle. The myocardial probability obtained in this way can be used for visualization, which eliminates the need for acquiring additional two-dimensional images. It also serves as the basis for border delineation, allowing quantification of important clinical parameters such as ventricular volume and mass.

Keyword [en]
MR velocity imaging, three-dimensional visualization, particle trace, trajectory, heart, border delineation, contrast enhancement
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-89144OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-89144DiVA: diva2:607263
Available from: 2013-02-22 Created: 2013-02-22 Last updated: 2013-09-03
In thesis
1. Cardiovascular fluid dynamics: methods for flow and pressure field analysis from magnetic resonance imaging
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cardiovascular fluid dynamics: methods for flow and pressure field analysis from magnetic resonance imaging
2001 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Cardiovascular blood flow is highly complex and incompletely understood. Blood flow patterns are expected to influence the opening and closing of normal and prosthetic heart valves, the efficiency of cardiac filling and ejection, and the resistance to thrombus formation within the heart. Conventional diagnostic techniques are poorly suited to the study of the three-dimensional (3D) blood flow patterns in the heart chambers and large vessels. Noninvasive methods have also been inadequate in studying intracardiac pressure differences, which are the driving force of flow and are critical in the evaluation of many cardiovascular abnormalities.

This thesis focuses on the development of non-invasive methods for analysis of 3D cardiovascular blood flow. Simultaneous study of cardiovascular fluid dynamics allowed knowledge exchange across the two disciplines, facilitating the development process and broadening the applicability of the methods.

A time-resolved 3D phase-contrast Magnetic Resonance lrnaging (MRI) technique was used to acquire the velocity vector field in a 3D volume encompassing the entire heart or a large vessel. Cardiovascular blood flow patterns were visualized by use of particle traces, which revealed, for instance, vortical flow patterns in the left atrium.

By applying the Navier-Stokes equation along a user-defined line in the 3D velocity vector field, the relative pressure could be obtained as an excellent supplement to the flow pattern visualization. Using a delineation of the blood pool, the time-varying 3D relative pressure field in the human left ventricle was obtained from the velocity field by use of the pressure Poisson equation.

A delineation of the heart muscle, a task that is almost impossible to perform on 3D MRI either automatically or manually, was also achieved by usage of particle traces. This segmentation allows automatic calculation of the 3D relative pressure field, as well as calculation of well-established parameters such as ventricle volume and mass.

Simultaneous 3D assessment of cardiovascular pressure and flow phenomena throughout the cardiac cycle offers an opportunity to expand our understanding of the basic determinants of time-varying flow in healthy and sick hearts, with the potential for improving our methods for diagnosis, medical treatment and surgical correction of cardiovascular diseases.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Linköping: Linköpings universitet, 2001. 48 p.
Series
Linköping Studies in Science and Technology. Dissertations, ISSN 0345-7524 ; 690
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-28144 (URN)12957 (Local ID)91-7373-021-1 (ISBN)12957 (Archive number)12957 (OAI)
Public defence
2001-05-23, Elsa Brändströmssalen, Universiterssjukhuset, Linköping, 10:15 (Swedish)
Opponent
Available from: 2009-10-08 Created: 2009-10-08 Last updated: 2013-09-03

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Ebbers, TinoWigström, Lars

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