liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Factors influencing patient safety in Sweden: perceptions of patient safety officers in the county councils
Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Health and Developmental Care, Patient Safety.
Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Health and Developmental Care, Patient Safety.
Show others and affiliations
2013 (English)In: BMC Health Services Research, ISSN 1472-6963, E-ISSN 1472-6963, Vol. 13, no 52Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background

National, regional and local activities to improve patient safety in Sweden have increased over the last decade. There are high ambitions for improved patient safety in Sweden. This study surveyed health care professionals who held key positions in their county council’s patient safety work to investigate their perceptions of the conditions for this work, factors they believe have been most important in reaching the current level of patient safety and factors they believe would be most important for achieving improved patient safety in the future.

Methods

The study population consisted of 218 health care professionals holding strategic positions in patient safety work in Swedish county councils. Using a questionnaire, the following topics were analysed in this study: profession/occupation; number of years involved in a designated task on patient safety issues; knowledge/overview of the county council’s patient safety work; ability to influence this work; conditions for this work; and the importance of various factors for current and future levels of patient safety.

Results

The response rate to the questionnaire was 79%. The conditions that had the highest number of responses in complete agreement were “patients’ involvement is important for patient safety” and “patient safety work has good support from the county council’s management”. Factors that were considered most important for achieving the current level of patient safety were root cause and risk analyses, incident reporting and the Swedish Patient Safety Law. An organizational culture that encourages reporting and avoids blame was considered most important for improved patient safety in the future, closely followed by improved communication between health care practitioners and patients.

Conclusion

Health care professionals with important positions in the Swedish county councils’ patient safety work believe that conditions for this work are somewhat constrained. They attribute the current levels of patient safety to a broad range of factors and believe that many different solutions can contribute to enhanced patient safety in the future, suggesting that this work must be multifactorial.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2013. Vol. 13, no 52
Keyword [en]
Patient safety, Patient involvement, Communication, Safety culture, Root cause analysis, Risk analysis, Incident reporting
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-90200DOI: 10.1186/1472-6963-13-52ISI: 000315330200001OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-90200DiVA: diva2:612361
Note

Funding Agencies|Swedish Association of Local Authorities and Regions (SALAR)||

Available from: 2013-03-28 Created: 2013-03-21 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Towards safer care in Sweden?: Studies of influences on patient safety
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Towards safer care in Sweden?: Studies of influences on patient safety
2016 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Patient safety has progressed in 15 years from being a relatively insignificant issue to a position high on the agenda for health care providers, managers and policymakers as well as the general public. Sweden has seen increased national, regional and local patient safety efforts since 2011 when a new patient safety law was introduced and a four-year financial incentive plan was launched to encourage county councils to carry out specified measures and meet certain patient safety related criteria. However, little is known about what structures and processes contribute to improved patient safety outcomes and how the context influences the results.

The overall aim of this thesis was to generate knowledge for improved understanding and explanation of influences on patient safety in the county councils in Sweden. To address this issue, five studies were con-ducted: interviews with nurses and infection control practitioners, surveys to patient safety officers and a document analysis of patient safety reports. Patient safety officers are healthcare professionals who hold key positions in their county council’s patient safety work. The findings from the studies were structured through a framework based on Donabedian’s triad (with a contextual element added) and applying a learning perspective, highlight areas that are potentially important to improve the patient safety in Swe-dish county councils.

Study I showed that the conditions for the county councils’ patient safety work could be improved. Conducting root-cause analysis and attaining an organizational culture that encourages reporting and avoids blame were perceived to be of importance for improving patient safety. Study II showed that nurses perceived facilitators and barriers for improved pa-tient safety at several system levels. Study III revealed many different types of obstacles to effective surveillance of health care-associated infec-tions (HAIs), the majority belonging to the early stages of the surveillance process. Many of the obstacles described by the infection control practi-tioners restricted the use of results in efforts to reduce HAIs. Study IV of the Patient Safety Reports identified 14 different structure elements of patient safety work, 31 process elements and 23 outcome elements. These reports were perceived by patient safety officers to be useful for providing a structure for patient safety work in the county councils, for enhancing the focus on patient safety issues and for learning from the patient safety work that is undertaken. In Study V the patient safety officers rated efforts to reduce the use of antibiotics and improved communication be-tween health care practitioners and patients as most important for attaining current and future levels of patient safety in their county council. The patient safety officers also perceived that the most successful county councils regarding patient safety have good leadership support, a long-term commitment and a functional work organisation for patient safety work.

Taken together, the five studies of this thesis demonstrate that patient safety is a multifaceted problem that requires multifaceted solutions. The findings point to an insufficient transition of assembled data and information into action and learning for improved patient safety.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press, 2016. 96 p.
Series
Linköping University Medical Dissertations, ISSN 0345-0082 ; 1503
Keyword
Patient safety, interventions, perceptions, learning from errors, patient safety reports, learning organization, patientsäkerhet, patientsäkerhetsberättelse, nationella initiativ, lärande organisation, uppfattningar
National Category
Health Care Service and Management, Health Policy and Services and Health Economy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-127307 (URN)10.3384/diss.diva-127307 (DOI)978-91-7685-857-8 (ISBN)
Public defence
2016-04-22, Belladonna, Hus 511-001, Campus US, Linköping, 13:00 (Swedish)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2016-04-27 Created: 2016-04-19 Last updated: 2016-04-27Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

fulltext(271 kB)383 downloads
File information
File name FULLTEXT01.pdfFile size 271 kBChecksum SHA-512
98c5af7ef9a6704e8a4419f25917ddaa17bd35982d9ebf31cd069cf283962dc6875e2d7f7696c142135da7e86dd6520feb6591efa5d7c8d909c2520485dd447d
Type fulltextMimetype application/pdf

Other links

Publisher's full text

Authority records BETA

Nygren, MikaelaRoback, KerstinÖhrn, AnnicaRutberg, HansRahmqvist, MikaelNilsen, Per

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Nygren, MikaelaRoback, KerstinÖhrn, AnnicaRutberg, HansRahmqvist, MikaelNilsen, Per
By organisation
Health Technology Assessment and Health EconomicsFaculty of Health SciencesPatient SafetySocial Medicine and Public Health Science
In the same journal
BMC Health Services Research
Medical and Health Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
Total: 383 downloads
The number of downloads is the sum of all downloads of full texts. It may include eg previous versions that are now no longer available

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 434 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf