liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Hyaluronic acid, an important factor in the wound healing properties of amniotic fluid: In vitro studies of re-epithelialisation in human skin wounds
Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Norrköping.
Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
Show others and affiliations
2013 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery and Hand Surgery, ISSN 2000-656X, E-ISSN 2000-6764, Vol. 47, no 2, 89-92 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Foetal wounds are unique in their ability to heal rapidly without forming scars. The amniotic fluid, rich in nutrients, growth factors, and hyaluronic acid, surrounds the foetus and is essential to foetal wound healing. The wound healing properties of foetal wounds may be the result of high concentrations of hyaluronic acid. This study aimed to verify that amniotic fluid induces re-epithelialisation in human skin wounds in vitro and to study whether this ability is dependent on hyaluronic acid. Standard deep dermal wounds were produced in vitro in human skin. The skin samples, with a central wound, were incubated in different culture media. Varying concentrations of amniotic fluid and amniotic fluid with added hyaluronidase were tested, and re-epithelialisation was assessed at 3, 7, and 12 days using light microscopy, after staining with haematoxylin and eosin. Amniotic fluid 50% resulted in a significantly higher (p andlt; 0.05) grade of re-epithelialisation than Dulbeccos modified Eagles medium and 10% amniotic fluid at all time points. When 50% amniotic fluid was compared with 10% foetal calf serum, no significant difference was found in grades of re-epithelialisation on days 3 and 12 and significantly higher grades of re-epithelialisation on day 7 (p andlt; 0.05). Degradation of hyaluronic acid in the medium that contained 50% amniotic fluid gave significantly impaired re-epithelialisation (p andlt; 0.05) on culture days 3 and 7. In conclusion, amniotic fluid promotes accelerated re-epithelialisation and hyaluronic acid is an important ingredient.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Informa Healthcare , 2013. Vol. 47, no 2, 89-92 p.
Keyword [en]
Amniotic fluid, fibroblasts, human, hyaluronic acid, hyaluronidase, in vitro, keratinocytes, wound healing
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-91006DOI: 10.3109/2000656X.2012.733169ISI: 000316362300002OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-91006DiVA: diva2:615672
Note

Funding Agencies|Swedish Fund for Research without Animal Experiments||

Available from: 2013-04-11 Created: 2013-04-11 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Guided Regeneration of the Human Skin: in vitro and in vivo studies
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Guided Regeneration of the Human Skin: in vitro and in vivo studies
2015 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Every day and in all parts of the world, humans experience different grades of wounding and tissue loss of the skin, thus initiating one of the most complex biological processes. Acute and chronic wounds, as well as the additional problem of skin scarring, involve not only great suffering for the patient but also extensive health care costs for the society. Although the wound-healing process is a wellstudied field much knowledge must be gained to unlock the door to regenerative pathways in humans.

Epidermis heals by complete regeneration, but dermal and full thickness injuries heal with fibrosis and scar formation. In Papers I and II, we studied whether dermal scarring could be turned into regeneration by using two different types of threedimensional dermal scaffolds. In Paper I, we studied a solid scaffold made of poly(urethane urea), initially in vitro then followed by in vivo studies. In Paper II, we intradermally injected a liquid three-dimensional scaffold consisting of porous gelatin spheres in human healthy volunteers. Both materials showed ingrowth of functional fibroblasts and blood vessels and appeared to stimulate regeneration while slowly degrading. This finding could be of significant clinical importance, for example in burn wound care or after cancer surgery.

In Papers III and IV, we wanted to study the effects of amniotic fluid and hyaluronic acid on adult wound healing, because early fetal wounds re-epithelialize rapidly and naturally heal dermis by regeneration without the need of a dermal scaffold. Amniotic fluid, naturally rich in hyaluronic acid, induced an accelerated reepithelialization of adult human wounds in vitro, and hyaluronic acid seemed to be important for this effect. Stimulation with exogenous hyaluronic acid in vivo induced accelerated re-epithelialization and an altered protein expression in healthy human volunteers. The inflammatory phase of wound healing, as measured by tissue viability imaging, was not affected by hyaluronic acid. Elucidating the effects of amniotic fluid and hyaluronic acid on the wound-healing process may allow improved treatment of wounds with impaired healing.

Studies on finding new dermal scaffolds and studies on the positive effect of amniotic fluid or hyaluronic acid on the wound-healing process are two different ways of gaining insight that may lead to regeneration and improved wound healing for the patient.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press, 2015. 95 p.
Series
Linköping University Medical Dissertations, ISSN 0345-0082 ; 1450
National Category
Medical Bioscience Cell Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-115598 (URN)10.3384/diss.diva-115598 (DOI)978-91-7519-114-0 (ISBN)
Public defence
2015-04-20, Berzeliussalen, Campus US, Linköping, 09:00 (Swedish)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2015-03-17 Created: 2015-03-17 Last updated: 2015-03-17Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full text

Authority records BETA

Nyman, ErikaHuss, FredrikNyman, TorbjörnJunker, JohanKratz, Gunnar

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Nyman, ErikaHuss, FredrikNyman, TorbjörnJunker, JohanKratz, Gunnar
By organisation
Department of Medical and Health SciencesFaculty of Health SciencesDepartment of Hand and Plastic SurgeryBurn CenterDepartment of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in NorrköpingCell BiologyPlastic Surgery, Hand Surgery and Burns
In the same journal
Scandinavian Journal of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery and Hand Surgery
Medical and Health Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 525 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf