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Comparing vocal fold contact criteria derived from audio and electroglottographic signals
Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Royal Inst Technol KTH, Dept Speech Mus & Hearing, Stockholm, Sweden; Boston Univ, Dept Speech Language & Hearing Sci, Boston, MA 02215 USA.
Dept. of Cognitive Biology, University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria; Palacky Univ Olomouc, Fac Sci, Dept Biophys, Voice Res Lab, Olomouc, Czech Republic.
Dept. of Speech, Music and Hearing, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Stockholm, Sweden.
Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Karolinska Inst, Dept CLINTEC, Stockholm, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-2208-0630
2016 (English)In: Journal of Voice, ISSN 0892-1997, E-ISSN 1873-4588, Vol. 30, no 4, 381-388 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Collision threshold pressure (CTP), i.e., the lowest subglottal pressure producing vocal fold contact during phonation, is a parameter likely to reflect relevant vocal fold properties. The amplitude of an electroglottographic (EGG) signal or the amplitude of its first derivative (dEGG) has been used as the criterion of such contact. Manual measurement of CTP is time-consuming, making the development of a simpler, alternative method desirable. In this investigation we compare CTP values automatically derived from the dEGG signal to values measured manually, and to values derived from a set of alternative parameters, some obtained from audio and some from EGG signals. One of the parameters was the novel EGG wavegram, which visualizes sequences of EGG or dEGG cycles, normalized with respect to period and amplitude. Raters with and without previous acquaintance with EGG analysis marked the disappearance of vocal fold contact in dEGG and in wavegram displays of /pa:/-sequences produced with continuously decreasing vocal loudness by seven singer subjects. Vocal fold contact was equally accurately identified in displays of dEGG amplitude as of wavegram. Automatically derived CTP values showed high correlation with those measured manually, and with those derived from the ratings of the visual displays. Seven other parameters were tested as criteria of such contact. Mainly due to noise in the EGG signal, most of them yielded CTP values differing considerably from those derived from the manual and the automatic methods, while the EGG spectrum slope showed a high correlation. The possibility of measuring CTP automatically seems promising for future investigations.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2016. Vol. 30, no 4, 381-388 p.
Keyword [en]
Collision threshold pressure, vocal fold contact, wavegram, alpha, signal-to-noise ratio, EGG derivative, EGG spectrum slope, relative contact rise time, normalized amplitude quotient, relative dEGG amplitude
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-91364DOI: 10.1016/j.jvoice.2015.05.015ISI: 000379526100001OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-91364DiVA: diva2:617379
Note

Funding agencies:This research has been partially supported by the European Social Fund Project CZ.1.07/2.3.00/30.0004 "POST-UP" (C.T.H.).

Vid tiden för disputation förelåg publikationen som manuskript

Available from: 2013-04-23 Created: 2013-04-23 Last updated: 2017-05-02Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Collision Threshold Pressure: A novel measure of voice function Effects of vocal warm-up, vocal loading and resonance tube phonation in water
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Collision Threshold Pressure: A novel measure of voice function Effects of vocal warm-up, vocal loading and resonance tube phonation in water
2013 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The phonation threshold pressure (PTP), i.e., the smallest amount of subglottal pressure needed to initiate and sustain vocal fold oscillation, is frequently difficult to measure due to the difficulty for some subjects to produce extremely soft phonation. In addition, PTP values are often quite scattered. Hence, the collision threshold pressure (CTP), i.e., the smallest amount of subglottal pressure needed for vocal fold collision, was explored as a possible complement or alternative to PTP. Effects on CTP and PTP of vocal warm-up (Paper 1), resonance tube phonation with the tube end in water (Paper 2), and vocal loading (Paper 3) were investigated. With the aim to accelerate the CTP measurement process, comparisons were made between CTP values derived manually and those derived by several automatic or semi-automatic parameters (Paper 4).

Subjects were recorded at various F0 while phonating /pa:/-sequences, starting at medium loudness and continuing until phonation ceased. Subglottal pressure was estimated from oral pressure signals during the /p/ occlusion. Vocal fold contact was determined manually from the amplitude of the electroglottographic (EGG) signal (Papers 1 and 3) or its first derivative (dEGG) (Papers 2 and 4).

Recordings were made before and after exercise: (Paper 1) Vocal warm-up was carried out in the 13 singers’ own habitual way. (Paper 2) Twelve mezzo-sopranos phonated on /u:/ at various pitches for two minutes before post-recording, and 15 seconds before each additional F0, into a glass tube (l=27 cm, id=9 mm) at a water depth of 1-2 cm.

(Paper 3) Five trained singers and five untrained subjects repeated the vowel sequence /a,e,i,o,u/ at a Sound Pressure Level of at least 80 dB at 0.3 m for 20 minutes.

Statistically significant results: (Paper 1) CTP and PTP decreased after warm-up in the five female voices. CTP was found to be higher than PTP (about 4 H2O). Also, CTP had a lower coefficient of variation, suggesting that CTP is a more reliable measure than PTP. (Paper 2) CTP increased on average six percent after resonance tube phonation in water.

(Paper 3) CTP and PTP increased after the vocal loading in the untrained voices, with an average after-to-before ratio of 1.26 for CTP and 1.33 for PTP.

(Paper 4) Automatically derived CTP values showed high correlation with those obtained manually, from EGG spectrum slope, and from the visual displays of dEGG and of dEGG wavegram.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press, 2013. 40 p.
Series
Linköping University Medical Dissertations, ISSN 0345-0082 ; 1322
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-91365 (URN)978-91-7519-815-6 (ISBN)
Public defence
2013-05-24, Eken, Campus US, Linköpings universitet, Linköping, 09:00 (English)
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Available from: 2013-04-23 Created: 2013-04-23 Last updated: 2015-09-22Bibliographically approved

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Enflo, LauraMcAllister, Anita

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