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Privacy and Distributed Tactical Operations Evaluation
Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
2011 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In this study, thoughts on ethics of workplace monitoring are being applied to the very special domain of evaluations of tactical operations, such as military or crisis management exercises or operations. I try to find out if there are differences in the way we should regard workplace monitoring when it comes to this domain compared to standard workplaces such as offices, since the purpose of the surveillance is not to enforce discipline, but to evaluate the organizations’ ability to conduct a tactical operation. The study focuses on issues such as privacy and informed consent and the main purpose of the investigation is to structure a consistent ethical standpoint when it comes to operations’ evaluation by making parallels to related theories that I found correct and applicable. I conclude that is indeed reasonable to place other demands on crisis management workers than we would do on other work forces, and that it should therefore be easier to motivate workplace monitoring for the purpose of evaluating distributed tactical operations. I argue however, just as Miller does regarding police work, that upholding privacy can be a real problem when crisis management personnel are exposed to monitoring, even though it is intended for evaluation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
CENTRIC , 2011. 34-39 p.
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-91988ISBN: 978-1-61208-167-0 (print)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-91988DiVA: diva2:619903
Conference
The Fourth International Conference on Advances in Human-oriented and Personalized Mechanisms, Technologies, and Services, CENTRIC 2011, October 23-29, 2011, Barcelona, Spain
Available from: 2013-05-07 Created: 2013-05-07 Last updated: 2013-05-07Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Mission Experience: How to Model and Capture it to Enable Vicarious Learning
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mission Experience: How to Model and Capture it to Enable Vicarious Learning
2013 (English)Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Organizations for humanitarian assistance, disaster response and military activities are characterized by their special role in society to resolve time-constrained and potentially life-threatening situations. The tactical missions that these organizations conduct regularly are significantly dynamic in character, and sometimes impossible to fully comprehend and predict. In these situations, when control becomes opportunistic, the organizations are forced to rely on the collective experience of their personnel to respond effectively to the unfolding threats. Generating such experience through traditional means of training, exercising and apprenticeship, is expensive, time-consuming, and difficult to manage.

This thesis explores how and why mission experience should be utilized in emergency management and military organizations to improve performance. A multimedia approach for capturing mission experience has further been tested in two case studies to determine how the commanders’ experiences can be externalized to enable vicarious learning. These studies propose a set of technical, methodological, and ethical issues that need to be considered when externalizing mission experience, based on two aforementioned case studies complemented by a literature review. The presented outcomes are (1) a model aligning abilities that tactical organizations need when responding to dynamic situations of different familiarity, (2) a review of the usefulness of several different data sources for externalization of commanders’ experiences from tactical operations, and (3) a review of methodological, technical, and ethical issues to consider when externalizing tactical military and emergency management operations. The results presented in this thesis indicate that multimedia approaches for capturing mission histories can indeed complement training and exercising as a method for generating valuable experience from tactical missions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press, 2013. 72 p.
Series
Linköping Studies in Science and Technology. Thesis, ISSN 0280-7971 ; 1582
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-90727 (URN)LiU-Tek-Lic-2013:16 (Local ID)978-91-7519-660-2 (ISBN)LiU-Tek-Lic-2013:16 (Archive number)LiU-Tek-Lic-2013:16 (OAI)
Presentation
2013-05-31, Alan Turing, Hus E, Campus Valla, Linköpings universitet, Linköping, 13:15 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Note

This work has been supported by the Swedish Defense Research Agency, the Swedish Armed Forces, the Swedish Civil Contingencies Agency (formerly the Swedish Rescue Services Agency and the Swedish Emergency Management Agency) and Forum Securitatis.

Available from: 2013-05-07 Created: 2013-04-04 Last updated: 2015-08-19Bibliographically approved

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Andersson, Dennis

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