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Audiovisual presentation supports cognitive processing of information heard in modulated noise
Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. (Linnaeus Centre HEAD, Swedish Institute for Disability Research,)
Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. (Linnaeus Centre HEAD, Swedish Institute for Disability Research,)
Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. (Linnaeus Centre HEAD, Swedish Institute for Disability Research,)
Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. (Linnaeus Centre HEAD, Swedish Institute for Disability Research,)
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2013 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The cognitive spare capacity test (CSCT) assesses the ability to process heard information stored in working memory. This is important because listening that is effortful, due to noise or hearing impairment, consumes cognitive resources leaving less capacity available for further processing. The CSCT pinpoints the effects of modality of presentation (Audiovisual, Audio-only); memory load (High, Low) and different kinds of executive processing demands (Updating, Inhibition). In the present study, 24 participants with mild to moderate hearing loss performed CSCT with amplification in quiet, in steady-state noise at an individually adapted signal to noise ratio (SNR) rendering intelligibility of ~95% and in modulated noise (International Speech Test Signal; ISTS) at the same SNR. An independent battery of cognitive tests was also administered. Analysis of variance showed main effects of all factors, including better performance with Audiovisual than Audio-only modality. However, a significant interaction revealed that the Audiovisual benefit was most prominent in ISTS. The benefit of Audiovisual presentation over Audio-only presentation correlated with the independent measure of working memory capacity. The pattern of results suggests that for the hearing impaired population, Audiovisual presentation supports cognitive processing of information heard in modulated noise and that the magnitude of this benefit is related to working memory capacity.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2013.
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-96599OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-96599DiVA: diva2:642385
Conference
Second International Conference on Cognitive Hearing science for Communication, Linköping,June 16-19, Sweden.
Available from: 2013-08-21 Created: 2013-08-21 Last updated: 2015-03-08

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The Swedish Institute for Disability ResearchDisability ResearchDepartment of Clinical and Experimental Medicine
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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf