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Using the SCOR model’s performance measurements to improve construction logistics
Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. (Bygglogistik)ORCID iD: 0000-0002-8989-4869
Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. (Bygglogistik)
2014 (English)In: Production planning & control (Print), ISSN 0953-7287, E-ISSN 1366-5871, Vol. 25, no 13/14, 1056-1078 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this paper, construction material supplier and construction site performance are assessed according to the supply chain operations reference (SCOR) model. Current applicable literature focuses mainly on assessing the main contractor’s ability to construct a building according to customer requirements, i.e. construction performance. Omitting supplier performance when evaluating construction performance reduces the ability to improve the construction supply chain, as reasons for cost and time overruns and quality deficiencies will often be overlooked. In this paper, the SCOR metrics perfect order fulfilment (POF), source cycle time (SCT) and cost to source(CS) are measured to assess construction supplier reliability and construction site responsiveness. The values for POF, SCT and CS are measured to be 38%, 134 min and EUR 249, respectively. The practical implications are summarised in five improvement suggestions concerning communication, predefined material allocation, supplier performance assessment, delivery verification and notification and use of the SCOR model.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2014. Vol. 25, no 13/14, 1056-1078 p.
Keyword [en]
construction industry, construction logistics, construction SCM, performance measurement, SCOR
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-96788DOI: 10.1080/09537287.2013.808836ISI: 000343288400002OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-96788DiVA: diva2:643347
Available from: 2013-08-27 Created: 2013-08-27 Last updated: 2017-12-06
In thesis
1. Towards a Framework for Process Mapping and Performance Measurement in Construction Supply Chains
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Towards a Framework for Process Mapping and Performance Measurement in Construction Supply Chains
2013 (English)Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The purpose with this study is to develop a framework for process mapping and performance measurement in construction supply chains. This is done as current literature suggest that many of the problems that cause the cost- and time overruns in construction can be mitigated by implementing supply chain management (SCM) principles. For example, temporary organisations, fragmentation, etc. can affect the time and cost as work and information among members easily are delayed and even distorted. It is also recognised by many authors that planning the construction work and logistics often are tainted with synchronisation and coordination problems between supply chain members. It is deemed necessary with a framework for mapping logistic activities and measuring supply chain performance. Up until now, there exists no framework for mapping the whole construction supply chain and measuring its performance, that encompasses the whole chain from raw material to the finished building.

As stated above, the purpose with this thesis is to develop such a framework. In order to do so an existing framework is used as a basis, the Supply Chain Operations Reference (SCOR) model. The SCOR model consists of five process groups (Plan, Source, Make, Deliver, and Return) hierarchically structured in three levels and some 500 predefined performance metrics. This framework is proven fruitful in other industries but it is also proven by other authors in the field suitable as a basis for a construction adapted version. Other frameworks do exist, but none of these are as comprehensive as the SCOR model. Resent research also suggests that the SCOR model is possible to adjust to unique industry settings. It is identified in this study that the SCOR model has to be adapted to the characteristics of the construction industry. Therefore, the framework presented in this thesis is developed via adaption of the SCOR model to the characteristics of the construction industry. In doing so, a total of four research objectives corresponding to the process groups in the SCOR model are considered for adapting the SCOR model. The Return process, however, is not included in this thesis.

Objective 1. Adapt the SCOR model’s Deliver process to the characteristics of the construction industry.

Objective 2. Adapt the SCOR model’s Source processes to the characteristics of the construction industry.

Objective 3. Adapt the SCOR model’s Make processes to the characteristics of the construction industry.

Objective 4. Adapt the SCOR model’s Plan processes to the characteristics of the construction industry.

The main method utilised in the study is case study research. The results are derived from a total of three case studies. The SCOR model is applied to the cases as it is. Through observing how suitable the framework is for the industry the four aforementioned objectives are addressed. Except from direct observations (with time measurements), other data gathering methods utilised are questionnaires and interviews.

The adapted version of the SCOR model is entitled the Builder’s SCOR model (BSCOR). Findings from the studies indicate that necessary changes to the SCOR model concerns how the material flow in the processes are separated. The SCOR model suggests separating materials based on type of end product (e.g. Make-to-Stock – MTS, Make-to-Order – MTO, or Engineer-to-Order – ETO character). In the BSCOR model, the flow of materials are separated based on who orders them (the main contractor or any of the subcontractors), rather than type of material. The BSCOR model also suggests how the planning process should be organised in order to overcome coordination issues. Finally, one measurement included in the BSCOR model is to keep track of whether an incoming delivery of construction materials is notified in time. An order is not perfectly delivered if it is not notified in time.

One managerial contribution with the study is a framework for mapping supply chain activities and measuring supply chain performance. The framework also offers the ability to measure how the supply chain of a company performs compared to other companies’ supply chains. The study contributes to the academia as it fills the gap of a lack in frameworks suitable for mapping and measuring construction logistics. It also contributes in reporting on the current logistics status in the construction industry.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press, 2013. 76 p.
Series
Linköping Studies in Science and Technology. Thesis, ISSN 0280-7971 ; 1631
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-101964 (URN)10.3384/lic.diva-101964 (DOI)LIU-TEK-LIC-2013:65 (Local ID)978-91-7519-462-2 (ISBN)LIU-TEK-LIC-2013:65 (Archive number)LIU-TEK-LIC-2013:65 (OAI)
Presentation
2013-12-06, K3, Kåkenhus, Campus Norrköping, Linköpings universitet, Norrköping, 13:15 (Swedish)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2013-11-25 Created: 2013-11-25 Last updated: 2013-12-03Bibliographically approved
2. Developing a Framework for Supply Chain Planning in Construction
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Developing a Framework for Supply Chain Planning in Construction
2016 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Supply chain management (SCM) has been stressed as a remedy to many of the underlying issues in the construction industry. However, the positive examples where SCM has been successfully utilised and diminished the lingering issues in construction is scarce. The question is why. Previous studies have stressed the importance of planning both the construction project as such but also the supply chain and the logistics. As an important part of SCM, supply chain planning (SCP) focuses on planning different aspects of the supply chain through involving different members of the supply chain in the planning process. SCP in construction is scarce as the planning of the logistics in general. Failing to plan the supply chain, involving supply chain members in the planning, and integrating the processes of planning the supply chains and the construction project can be one reason for the low numbers of successful SCM adoption in construction. In improving the SCP in construction, this thesis develops a SCP framework for construction that involves the main contractor, subcontractors, and suppliers. The aim is to improve SCP, collaboration, and eliminate many of the common problems in construction through a SCM and SCP perspective.

The developed framework is based on an existing planning framework for sales and operations planning. This framework is generic and synthesises planning in general. It consists of identifying/developing: outcomes, input, organisation, process, key performance measurements, and IT-tools. It is thus necessary to investigate what these aspects means in a construction context. Four research objects will be fulfilled:

Objective 1. Identify common logistical problems and linkages between them

Objective 2. Develop a SCP process

Objective 3. Develop a SCP organisation

Objective 4. Identify performance measurements

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press, 2016. 82 p.
Series
Linköping Studies in Science and Technology. Dissertations, ISSN 0345-7524 ; 1782
National Category
Transport Systems and Logistics Software Engineering Economics and Business
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-131617 (URN)10.3384/diss.diva-131617 (DOI)9789176857038 (ISBN)
Public defence
2016-11-18, TP2, Täppan, Campus Norrköping, Norrköping, 10:15 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Note

This thesis is funded by Development Fund of the Swedish Construction Industry (SBUF).

Companies that have participated in this work are PEAB, NCC, JM, Arcona,Skanska, Paroc, Vedum, Knauf-Danogips, Bygg-Ole, and Marbodal.

Available from: 2016-09-28 Created: 2016-09-28 Last updated: 2016-10-11Bibliographically approved

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Thunberg, MicaelPersson, Fredrik

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