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The lysosome: from waste bag to potential therapeutic target
Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-4075-159X
2013 (English)In: Journal of Molecular Cell Biology, ISSN 1674-2788, E-ISSN 1759-4685, Vol. 5, no 4, 214-226 p.Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Lysosomes are ubiquitous membrane-bound intracellular organelles with an acidic interior. They are central for degradation and recycling of macromolecules delivered by endocytosis, phagocytosis, and autophagy. In contrast to the rather simplified view of lysosomes as waste bags, nowadays lysosomes are recognized as advanced organelles involved in many cellular processes and are considered crucial regulators of cell homeostasis. The function of lysosomes is critically dependent on soluble lysosomal hydrolases (e.g. cathepsins) as well as lysosomal membrane proteins (e.g. lysosome-associated membrane proteins). This review focuses on lysosomal involvement in digestion of intra- and extracellular material, plasma membrane repair, cholesterol homeostasis, and cell death. Regulation of lysosomal biogenesis and function via the transcription factor EB (TFEB) will also be discussed. In addition, lysosomal contribution to diseases, including lysosomal storage disorders, neurodegenerative disorders, cancer, and cardiovascular diseases, is presented.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press (OUP): Policy B - Oxford Open Option D , 2013. Vol. 5, no 4, 214-226 p.
Keyword [en]
degradation, apoptosis, lysosomal membrane permeabilization, exocytosis, cholesterol
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-97246DOI: 10.1093/jmcb/mjt022ISI: 000322914000002OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-97246DiVA: diva2:645787
Note

Funding Agencies|Swedish Research Council||Swedish Cancer Society||Signhild Engkvist foundation||

Available from: 2013-09-05 Created: 2013-09-05 Last updated: 2017-12-06

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Appelqvist, HannaWäster, PetraKågedal, KatarinaÖllinger, Karin

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Appelqvist, HannaWäster, PetraKågedal, KatarinaÖllinger, Karin
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