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Prediction of conductive hearing loss using wideband acoustic immittance
Syracuse University, Syracuse, New York, USA.
Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, Oregon, USA.
Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-3350-8997
University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada.
2013 (English)In: Ear and Hearing, ISSN 0196-0202, E-ISSN 1538-4667, Vol. 34, no Supplement 1, 54s-59s p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The purpose of this article was to review the effectiveness of wideband acoustic immittance (WAI) and tympanometry in detecting conductive hearing loss (CHL). Eight studies were included that measured CHL through air-and bone-conducted thresholds in at least a portion of their participants. One study included infants, three studies included children, one study included older children and adults, and three studies included adults. WAI identified CHL well in all populations. In infants and children, WAI in several single-frequency bands identified CHL with equal accuracy to measures of middle ear admittance using clinical tympanometry with a single probe tone (1000 Hz for infants; 226 Hz for children and adults). When WAI was combined across frequency bands, it identified CHL superior to traditional, single-frequency tympanometry. Only two studies used WAI tympanometry, which assesses the outer/middle ear across both frequency and introduced air pressure, and differing results were reported as to whether introducing pressure into the ear canal provides better identification of CHL. In general, WAI appears to be a promising clinical tool, and further investigation is warranted.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2013. Vol. 34, no Supplement 1, 54s-59s p.
National Category
Otorhinolaryngology Medical Engineering
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-97730DOI: 10.1097/AUD.0b013e31829c9670ISI: 000326278100010PubMedID: 23900182OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-97730DiVA: diva2:650616
Available from: 2013-09-23 Created: 2013-09-23 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved

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Stenfelt, Stefan

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
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  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
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  • Other style
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  • de-DE
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  • sv-SE
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