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Homegardens as a Multi-functional Land-Use Strategy in Sri Lanka with Focus on Carbon Sequestration
Chalmers University of Technology, Göteborg, Sweden .
Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Chalmers University of Technology, Göteborg, Sweden .ORCID iD: 0000-0002-4484-266X
University of Peradeniya, Sri Lanka .
University of Peradeniya, Sri Lanka .
2013 (English)In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 42, no 7, 892-902 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper explores the concept of homegardens and their potential functions as strategic elements in land-use planning, and adaptation and mitigation to climate change in Sri Lanka. The ancient and locally adapted agroforestry system of homegardens is presently estimated to occupy nearly 15 % of the land area in Sri Lanka and is described in the scientific literature to offer several ecosystem services to its users; such as climate regulation, protection against natural hazards, enhanced land productivity and biological diversity, increased crop diversity and food security for rural poor and hence reduced vulnerability to climate change. Our results, based on a limited sample size, indicate that the homegardens also store significant amount of carbon, with above ground biomass carbon stocks in dry zone homegardens (n = 8) ranging from 10 to 55 megagrams of carbon per hectare (Mg C ha(-1)) with a mean value of 35 Mg C ha(-1), whereas carbon stocks in wet zone homegardens (n = 4) range from 48 to 145 Mg C ha(-1) with a mean value of 87 Mg C ha(-1). This implies that homegardens may contain a significant fraction of the total above ground biomass carbon stock in the terrestrial system in Sri Lanka, and from our estimates its share has increased from almost one-sixth in 1992 to nearly one-fifth in 2010. In the light of current discussions on reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation (REDD+), the concept of homegardens in Sri Lanka provides interesting aspects to the debate and future research in terms of forest definitions, setting reference levels, and general sustainability.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Netherlands, 2013. Vol. 42, no 7, 892-902 p.
Keyword [en]
Land rehabilitation, Carbon sequestration and offsets, Land-use expansion and intensification, REDD+ implications
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-99436DOI: 10.1007/s13280-013-0390-xISI: 000325357000010OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-99436DiVA: diva2:657127
Funder
Swedish Energy Agency
Available from: 2013-10-18 Created: 2013-10-18 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved

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Ostwald, Madelene

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