liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
An interactive 3D visualization and manipulation tool foreffective assessment of angiogenesis and arteriogenesis usingcomputed tomographic angiography
Image and Pattern Analysis Laboratory, Department of Computer and Information Science, University of Massachusetts.
Angiogenesis Research Center, Departments of Radiology and Cardiology, Dartmouth Medical School, Lebanon.
Angiogenesis Research Center, Departments of Radiology and Cardiology, Dartmouth Medical School, Lebanon.
Angiogenesis Research Center, Departments of Radiology and Cardiology, Dartmouth Medical School, Lebanon.
Show others and affiliations
2005 (English)In: Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging, ISSN 1605-7422, E-ISSN 1042-4687, Vol. 5744, no II, 848-858 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper presents IVM, an Interactive Vessel Manipulation tool that can help make effective and efficient assessment

of angiogenesis and arteriogenesis in computed tomographic angiography (CTA) studies. IVM consists

of three fundamental components: (1) a visualization component, (2) a tracing component, and (3) a measurement

component. Given a user-specified threshold, IVM can create a 3D surface visualization based on it. Since

vessels are thin and tubular structures, using standard isosurface extraction techniques usually cannot yield

satisfactory reconstructions. Instead, IVM directly renders the surface of a derived binary 3D image. The image

volumes collected in CTA studies often have a relatively high resolution. Thus, compared with more complicated

vessel extraction and visualization techniques, rendering the binary image surface has the advantages of being

effective, simple and fast. IVM employs a semi-automatic approach to determine the threshold: a user can adjust

the threshold by checking the corresponding 3D surface reconstruction and make the choice. Typical tracing

software often defines ROIs on 3D image volumes using three orthogonal views. The tracing component in IVM

takes one step further: it can perform tracing not only on image slices but also in a 3D view. We observe that

directly operating on a 3D view can help a tracer identify ROIs more easily. After setting a threshold and tracing

an ROI, a user can use IVM’s measurement component to estimate the volume and other parameters of vessels

in the ROI. The effectiveness of the IVM tool is demonstrated on rat vessel/bone images collected in a previous

CTA study.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2005. Vol. 5744, no II, 848-858 p.
Keyword [en]
Computed tomographic angiography, 3D surface visualization, region of interest, vessel extraction
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences Natural Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-99991DOI: 10.1117/12.596138OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-99991DiVA: diva2:659204
Available from: 2013-10-24 Created: 2013-10-24 Last updated: 2017-12-06

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full text

Authority records BETA

De Muinck, Ebo

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
De Muinck, Ebo
In the same journal
Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging
Medical and Health SciencesNatural Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 32 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf