liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Nitrous oxide for monitoring fluid absorption in volunteers
Karolinska Institute, South Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
Karolinska Institute, South Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
Karolinska Institute, South Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
2007 (English)In: British Journal of Anaesthesia, ISSN 0007-0912, E-ISSN 1471-6771, Vol. 98, no 1, 53-59 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: We studied whether nitrous oxide (N(2)O) added to a fluid allows the infused volume to be quantified by measuring N(2)O in the expired air during normal breathing. If so, N(2)O might serve as a tracer of fluid absorption during endoscopic surgery.

METHODS: Twelve male volunteers received continuous and intermittent i.v. infusions (5-45 min) of fluid containing 40 ml litre(-1) of N(2)O. Breath N(2)O and CO(2) concentrations were measured every second via a flared nasal cannula, a standard nasal cannula, or a Hudson mask.

RESULTS: An expression for the amount of infused fluid was obtained by calculating the area under the N(2)O concentration-time curve for samples representative for exhalation (CO(2)>median) and then dividing this area by the median CO(2) for the remaining samples. The N(2)O method then estimated fluid volumes of between 50 and 1400 ml within a 95% prediction interval of +/-200 ml. There were differences of up to 14% in results between the airway devices tested, but the volunteers preferred the flared nasal cannula. N(2)O showed a distinctly higher 3 min variability during intermittent infusion, which could indicate whether fluid absorption is directly intravascular or extravascular. No adverse effects were seen.

CONCLUSIONS: N(2)O method does not require forced end-expiratory breath sampling but still predicts an administered fluid volume with high precision. N(2)O variability can probably be used to distinguish immediately between intravascular and perivesical fluid absorption during surgery.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2007. Vol. 98, no 1, 53-59 p.
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-100188DOI: 10.1093/bja/ael311PubMedID: 17142823OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-100188DiVA: diva2:660684
Available from: 2013-10-30 Created: 2013-10-30 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMed

Authority records BETA

Hahn, Robert G.

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Hahn, Robert G.
In the same journal
British Journal of Anaesthesia
Medical and Health Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn
Total: 63 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf