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Cancer cell response to nanoparticles: criticality and optimality
University of Calcutta, Kolkata, India.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-6142-5489
University of Calcutta, Kolkata, India.
2012 (English)In: Nanomedicine: Nanotechnology, Biology and Medicine, ISSN 1549-9634, E-ISSN 1549-9642, Vol. 8, no 6, 841-852 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A stochastic variation in size and electrical parameters is common in nanoparticles. Synthesizing gold nanoparticles with a varying range of size and zeta potential, we show that there is clustering at certain regions of hydrodynamic diameter and zeta potentials that can be classified using k-clustering technique. A cluster boundary was observed around 50 nm, a size known for its optimal response to cells. However, neither size nor zeta potential alone determined the optimal cellular response (e.g., percentage cell survival) induced by such nanoparticles. A complex interplay prevails between size, zeta potential, nature of surface functionalization, and extent of adhesion of the cell to a solid matrix. However, it follows that the ratio of zeta potential to surface area, which scales as the electrical field (by Gaussian law), serves as an appropriate indicator for optimal cellular response. The phase plot spanned by fractional survival and effective electric field (charge density) indicates a positive correlation between mean cell survival and the magnitude of the electric field. The phase plot spanned by fractional survival and effective electric field (charge density) associated with the nanosurface shows a bifurcation behavior. Wide variation of cell survival response is observed at certain critical values of the surface charge density, whereas in other ranges the cellular response is well behaved and more predictable. Existence of phase points near the critical region corresponds to wide fluctuation of nanoparticle-induced response, for small changes in the nanosurface property. Smaller nanoparticles with low zeta potential (e.g., those conjugated with arginine) can have such an attribute (i.e., higher electrical field strength), and eventually they cause more cell death. The study may help in optimal design of nanodrugs.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2012. Vol. 8, no 6, 841-852 p.
Keyword [en]
Nanoparticles; Optimality; Zeta potential; Hydrodynamic size; Cancer cell response
National Category
Medical Biotechnology (with a focus on Cell Biology (including Stem Cell Biology), Molecular Biology, Microbiology, Biochemistry or Biopharmacy)
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-100877DOI: 10.1016/j.nano.2011.10.009PubMedID: 22094123OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-100877DiVA: diva2:664093
Available from: 2013-11-13 Created: 2013-11-13 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved

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Patra, Hirak

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