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Imaging hair cell transduction at the speed of sound: dynamic behavior of mammalian stereocilia
Karolinska Institutet, M1 Karolinska Universitetssjukhuset, Stockholm, Sweden .
Karolinska Institutet, M1 Karolinska Universitetssjukhuset, Stockholm, Sweden.
Karolinska Institutet, M1 Karolinska Universitetssjukhuset, Stockholm, Sweden.
Karolinska Institutet, M1 Karolinska Universitetssjukhuset, Stockholm, Sweden.
2006 (English)In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, ISSN 0027-8424, E-ISSN 1091-6490, Vol. 103, no 6, 1918-1923 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The cochlea contains two types of sensory cells, the inner and outer hair cells. Sound-evoked deflection of outer hair cell stereocilia leads to fast force production that will enhance auditory sensitivity up to 1,000-fold. In contrast, inner hair cells are thought to have a purely receptive function. Deflection of their stereocilia produces receptor potentials, transmitter release, and action potentials in the auditory nerve. Here, we describe a method for rapid confocal imaging. The method was used to image stereocilia during simultaneous sound stimulation in an in vitro preparation of the guinea pig cochlea. We show that inner hair cell stereocilia move because they interact with the fluid surrounding the hair bundles, but stereocilia deflection occurs at a different phase of the stimulus than is generally expected. In outer hair cells, stereocilia deflections were approximately 1/3 of the reticular lamina displacement. Smaller deflections were found in inner hair cells. The ratio between stereocilia deflection and reticular lamina displacement is important for auditory function, because it determines the stimulus applied to transduction channels. The low ratio measured here suggests that amplification of hair-bundle movements may be necessary in vivo to preserve transduction fidelity at low stimulus levels. In the case of the inner hair cells, this finding would represent a departure from traditional views on their function.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
National Academy of Sciences , 2006. Vol. 103, no 6, 1918-1923 p.
National Category
Neurosciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-101068DOI: 10.1073/pnas.0507231103PubMedID: 16446441OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-101068DiVA: diva2:665149
Available from: 2013-11-19 Created: 2013-11-19 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved

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Fridberger, Anders

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