liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Unexplained chest pain in relation to psychosocial factors and health-related quality of life in men and women
The Sahlgrenska Academy, Göteborg University, Sweden.
John Hopkins University, School of Nursing, Baltimore, USA .
The Sahlgrenska Academy, Göteborg University, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-2764-3095
The Sahlgrenska Academy, Göteborg University, Sweden.
2007 (English)In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 6, no 4, 329-336 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND:

Unexplained chest pain is a frequent and increasingly common complaint among patients admitted to Emergency Departments. Previous studies have defined unexplained chest pain as non-cardiac or non-coronary artery disease, i.e. patients with other organic causes explaining the chest pain could be included. To increase the knowledge of unexplained chest pain, this study only includes patients without any known explanation for their chest pain.

AIM:

To analyze gender differences regarding pain characteristics, psychosocial factors and health-related quality of life among patients diagnosed unexplained chest pain.

METHODS AND RESULTS:

The results are based on 179 patients (101 men, 78 women) between 16 and 69 years old (mean age 45.3) consecutively admitted to Emergency Department. Pain characteristics were assessed by Pain-O-Meter. Social relationships, depression, anxiety, and health-related quality of life were measured by a self-administered questionnaire. There were no gender differences regarding chest pain intensity; however women described their pain as burning (p<0.01) and frightening (p<0.03) more often than men. Men reported less depression (p<0.01) and less trait anxiety (p=0.01) than women. Chest pain intensity did not significantly impact health-related quality of life except physical functioning in men (p=0.05).

CONCLUSION:

Gender differences were few. Chest pain intensity did not significantly impact health-related quality of life.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2007. Vol. 6, no 4, 329-336 p.
Keyword [en]
Chest pain; Gender; Psychosocial factors; Quality of life
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-101537DOI: 10.1016/j.ejcnurse.2007.05.001PubMedID: 17581792OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-101537DiVA: diva2:666467
Available from: 2013-11-22 Created: 2013-11-22 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMed

Authority records BETA

Kjellgren, Karin

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Kjellgren, Karin
In the same journal
European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing
Medical and Health Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn
Total: 34 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf