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The effects of native and non-native target and distractor language on speech perception are modulated by non-native proficiency
Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. ENT/audiology, VU University Medical Center, the Netherlands.
Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping. (HEAD)
Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
2013 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Identifying speech in noisy conditions requires both native and non-native listeners to cope with decreased intelligibility and thereby an increased cognitive load. The current study examined in four speech reception threshold (SRT) conditions how energetic (stationary, fluctuating) and informational (two-talker babble Swedish, two-talker babble English) maskers interfered with target speech in Swedish (native language) and English (non-native language). The participants also performed standardized tests in English proficiency, nonverbal reasoning and working memory capacity; the latter in both Swedish and English. Twenty-three normal-hearing native Swedish listeners participated, 13 females and 10 males, age-range between 28 and 64 years.The main result was that the target language, masker type and English proficiency all affected speech perception. The SRT’s were better when the target language was Swedish. The informational maskers were interfering more with perception than energetic maskers, specifically in the non-native language. High English proficiency was beneficial in three out of four conditions when the target language was English. The findings suggest that English proficiency is essential regarding automaticity in perceiving this non-native language

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2013. 153- p.
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-103055OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-103055DiVA: diva2:686454
Conference
Second International Conference on Cognitive Hearing Science for Communication, Linköping University, Sweden, June 16-19, 2013
Available from: 2014-01-12 Created: 2014-01-12 Last updated: 2014-02-28

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Kilman, LisaZekveld, AdrianaHällgren, MathiasRönnberg, Jerker

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Kilman, LisaZekveld, AdrianaHällgren, MathiasRönnberg, Jerker
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The Swedish Institute for Disability ResearchDisability ResearchFaculty of Arts and SciencesTechnical AudiologyFaculty of Health SciencesDepartment of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping
Social Sciences

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
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  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
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Output format
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