liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
A goal function approach to remodeling of arteries uncovers mechanisms for growth instability
Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Mechanics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Mechanics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-1503-8293
Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Mechanics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-8460-0131
2014 (English)In: Biomechanics and Modeling in Mechanobiology, ISSN 1617-7959, E-ISSN 1617-7940, Vol. 13, no 6, 1243-1259 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A novel, goal function-based formulation for the growth dynamics of arteries is introduced, and used for investigating the development of growth instability in blood vessels. Such instabilities would lead to abnormal growth of the vessel, reminiscent of an aneurysm. The blood vessel  is modeled as a thin-walled cylindrical tube and the constituents that form the vessel wall are assumed to deform together as a constrained mixture. The growth dynamics of the composite material of the vessel wall is described by an evolution equation, where the effective area of each constituent changes in the direction of steepest descent of a goal function. This goal function is formulated in such way that the constituents grow toward a target potential energy and a target composition. The convergence of the simulated response of the evolution equation toward a target homeostatic state is investigated for a range of isotropic and orthotropic material models. These simulations suggest that elastin-deficient vessels are more prone to growth instability. Increased stiffness of the vessel wall, on the other hand, gives a more stable growth process. Another important finding is that an increased rate of degradation of materials impairs growth stability.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2014. Vol. 13, no 6, 1243-1259 p.
Keyword [en]
Goal function, Constrained mixture theory, Stability, Growth and remodeling, Blood vessel, Artery
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-104186DOI: 10.1007/s10237-014-0569-5ISI: 000343210900007OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-104186DiVA: diva2:695188
Available from: 2014-02-10 Created: 2014-02-10 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Goal Function Approach to Growth and Remodeling of Arteries
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Goal Function Approach to Growth and Remodeling of Arteries
2014 (English)Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

In this thesis we develop a new goal function approach to investigate stability of the growth processes in blood vessels and cost-optimal composition and geometry of these vessels. In the vascular system of a healthy individual, the living composition of the arterial wall must regenerate and remodel continuously during the entire lifetime to maintain itself. In some cases the system destabilizes due to disease, injury or other complex processes. To understand how and when this happens, several mathematical models have been developed. These models have included an evolution equation for mass fractions of the vessel wall, describing how the vessel develops from an actual state to a target state. These works are based on constrained mixture theory (CMT), which takes care of production and removal of arterial constituents. The cost-optimal design of blood vessels has been studied previously by Murray.

The aim of this thesis is to contribute to stability analyses of the growth process by formulating a new goal function approach, making it possible to examine under which conditions instability arises. We also aim to analyze changes in the optimum material composition and geometry of the vessel wall, using a more realistic, nonlinear material model.

The blood vessel is modeled as a thin-walled tube and the constituents that form the vessel wall are assumed to deform together (CMT). The growth dynamics of the composite material of the vessel wall is described by an evolution equation, where the effective area of each constituent changes in the direction of steepest descent of a goal function. This goal function is formulated in such way that the constituents grow toward a target potential energy and a target composition. The response of the evolution equation is simulated for several dierent material models. These simulations suggest that elastin-decient vessels are more prone to growth instability, but that increased vessel stiness gives a more stable growth process. Another important nding is that an increased rate of degradation of materials impairs growth stability.

By extending Murray's law to include effects of nonlinear mechanics of the artery wall and a growth and remodeling mechanism based on CMT, and at the same time having the system satisfy an equilibrium equation, we study cost-optimal compositions and geometries of the vessel wall. This gives new insight into the wall's architecture under optimal conditions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press, 2014. 19 p.
Series
Linköping Studies in Science and Technology. Thesis, ISSN 0280-7971 ; 1639
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-104188 (URN)10.3384/lic.diva-104188 (DOI)LIU-TEK-LIC-2013:73 (Local ID)978-91-7519-433-2 (ISBN)LIU-TEK-LIC-2013:73 (Archive number)LIU-TEK-LIC-2013:73 (OAI)
Presentation
2014-02-28, A32, A-huset, Campus Valla, Linköpings universitet, Linköping, 13:15 (Swedish)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2014-02-10 Created: 2014-02-10 Last updated: 2017-05-15Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

fulltext(780 kB)177 downloads
File information
File name FULLTEXT01.pdfFile size 780 kBChecksum SHA-512
d6536bcad84e834fa81e40ffe4176bf81a43eddb9227a08bff19f25b7d88e8f505962eddccb7ebf66626912f2a15a2791727d12b0037307d85e88a539de0dbfc
Type fulltextMimetype application/pdf

Other links

Publisher's full text

Authority records BETA

Satha, GanarupanLindström, Stefan B.Klarbring, Anders

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Satha, GanarupanLindström, Stefan B.Klarbring, Anders
By organisation
MechanicsThe Institute of Technology
In the same journal
Biomechanics and Modeling in Mechanobiology
Engineering and Technology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
Total: 177 downloads
The number of downloads is the sum of all downloads of full texts. It may include eg previous versions that are now no longer available

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 1211 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf