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Beyond speech intelligibility testing: A memory test for assessment of signal processing interventions in ecologically valid listening situations
Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten.
Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
2014 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Performance of hearing aid signal processing is often assessed by speech intelligibility in noisetests, such as the HINT, CRM, or SPIN sentences presented in a background of noise or babble.Usually these tests are most sensitive at a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) below 0 dB. However, in arecent study by Smeds et al. (2012) it was shown that the SNRs in ecological listening situations(e.g. kitchen, babble, and car) were typically well above 0 dB SNR. That is, SNRs where the speechintelligibility in noise tests are insensitive.Cognitive Spare Capacity (CSC) refers to the residual capacity after successful speech perception.In a recent study by Ng et al. (2010), we dened the residual capacity to be number of words recalledafter successful listening to a number of HINT sentences, inspired by Sarampalis et al. (2009).In a recent test with 26 hearing impaired test subjects we showed that close to 100% correctspeech intelligibility in a four talker babble noise required around + 7 dB SNR. At that SNR it wasshown that a hearing aid noise reduction scheme improved memory recall by about 10-15%. Thus,this kind of memory recall test is a possible candidate for assessment of hearing aid functionality inecologically relevant (positive) SNRs

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2014.
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-104967OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-104967DiVA: diva2:702219
Conference
6th Workshop on Speech in Noise, CNRS - Laboratoire de Mécanique et d'Acoustique, Marseille, France January 9-10 2014
Available from: 2014-03-04 Created: 2014-03-04 Last updated: 2017-11-06

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Lunner, ThomasNg, ElaineRudner, MaryRönnberg, Jerker

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The Swedish Institute for Disability ResearchDepartment of Behavioural Sciences and LearningFaculty of Arts and SciencesDepartment of Clinical and Experimental Medicine
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