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Cognitive aspects of auditory plasticity across the lifespan
Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. (Linnaeus Centre HEAD)
Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark. (Linnaeus Centre HEAD)
2013 (English)In: ISAAR 2013, 2013, 201-211 p.Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

This paper considers evidence of plasticity resulting from congenital and acquired hearing impairment as well as technical and language interventions. Speech communication is hindered by hearing loss. Individuals with normal hearing in childhood may experience hearing loss as they grow older and use technical and cognitive resources to maintain speech communication. The short- and medium-term effects of hearing aid interventions seem to be mediated by individual cognitive abilities and may be specific to listening conditions including speech content, type of background noise and type of hearing aid signal processing. Furthermore, some aspects of cognitive function may decline with age and there is evidence that age-related hearing impairment is associated with poorer long-term memory. It is not yet clear whether improving audition through hearing aid intervention can prevent cognitive decline. Profound deafness from an early age implicates a set of critical choices relating to possible restoration of the auditory signal through the use of prostheses including cochlear implants and hearing aids as well as to mode of communication, sign or speech. These choices have an influence on the organization of the developing brain. In particular, while the cortex may display sensory reorganization in response

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2013. 201-211 p.
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-105116OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-105116DiVA: diva2:703691
Conference
4th International Symposium on Auditory and Audiological Research (ISAAR 2013), 28-30 August 2013, Nyborg, Denmark
Note

Invited

Available from: 2014-03-07 Created: 2014-03-07 Last updated: 2017-11-06Bibliographically approved

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Rudner, MaryLunner, Thomas

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

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Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf