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Self-estimation or Phototest Measurement of Skin UV Sensitivity and its Association with Peoples Attitudes Towards Sun Exposure
Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Primary Health Care in Central County. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
2014 (English)In: Anticancer Research, ISSN 0250-7005, E-ISSN 1791-7530, Vol. 34, no 2, 797-803 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND:

Fitzpatrick's classification is the most common way of assessing skin UV sensitivity. The study aim was to investigate how self-estimated and actual UV sensitivity, as measured by phototest, are associated with attitudes towards sunbathing and the propensity to increase sun protection, as well as the correlation between self-estimated and actual UV sensitivity.

PATIENTS AND METHODS:

A total of 166 primary healthcare patients filled-out a questionnaire investigating attitudes towards sunbathing and the propensity to increase sun protection. They reported their skin type according to Fitzpatrick, and a UV sensitivity phototest was performed.

RESULTS:

Self-rated low UV sensitivity (skin type III-VI) was associated with a more positive attitude towards sunbathing and a lower propensity to increase sun protection, compared to high UV sensitivity. The correlation between the two methods was weak.

CONCLUSION:

The findings might indicate that individuals with a perceived low but in reality high UV sensitivity do not seek adequate sun protection with regard to skin cancer risk. Furthermore, the poor correlation between self-reported and actual UV sensitivity, measured by phototest, makes the clinical use of Fitzpatrick's classification questionable.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
International Institute of Anticancer Research (IIAR) , 2014. Vol. 34, no 2, 797-803 p.
Keyword [en]
Ultraviolet rays; skin neoplasms; skin type; phototest; attitudes
National Category
Health Sciences Dermatology and Venereal Diseases
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-105410ISI: 000331497200033PubMedID: 24511015Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84897066243OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-105410DiVA: diva2:706659
Available from: 2014-03-21 Created: 2014-03-21 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved

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Falk, Magnus

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