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Effects of Acoustic Overstimulation and the Associated Cellular Lesions on the Cochlear Amplifier: Simulation Results
Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-3350-8997
2014 (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

A physiologically-based electromechanical model of the human cochlea is used in this study to explicitly simulate the effects of acoustical overstimulation, and the associated cellular deficiencies, on the gain of the cochlear amplifier. The simulations demonstrate that as the micromechanics of the stereocillia transduction channels is altered due to the traumatic acoustical overstimulation, the compressive/nonlinear behavior of the cochlear amplifier is significantly modified. When the loudness growth is estimated by the integral of the cochlear amplification with respect to the sound intensity, these modifications lead to an impaired loudness function reminiscent of the recruitment phenomenon. Furthermore, when a severe noise-induced loss of outer hair cells is assumed at basal regions of the cochlea, the model predicts a mild loss at lower frequencies followed by a steeply sloping notch-like amplification loss of approximately 80 dB around 4.5 kHz. This prediction is reasonably in line with the threshold elevations observed clinically from the noise-damaged human ears. Moreover, the results quantitatively demonstrate that the center frequency, the width and the depth of the amplification loss are directly determined by the severity and the location of the outer hair cell loss along the cochlear duct.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2014.
National Category
Otorhinolaryngology Medical Engineering
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-105808OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-105808DiVA: diva2:710708
Available from: 2014-04-08 Created: 2014-04-08 Last updated: 2015-04-01Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Effects of Specific Cochlear Pathologies on the Auditory Functions: Modelling, Simulations and Clinical Implications
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of Specific Cochlear Pathologies on the Auditory Functions: Modelling, Simulations and Clinical Implications
2014 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

A hearing impairment is primarily diagnosed by measuring the hearing thresholds at a range of auditory frequencies (air-conduction audiometry). Although this clinical procedure is simple, affordable, reliable and fast, it does not offer differential information about origins of the hearing impairment. The main goal of this thesis is to quantitatively link specific cochlear pathologies to certain changes in the spectral and temporal characteristics of the auditory system. This can help better understand the underlying mechanisms associated with sensorineural hearing impairments, beyond what is shown in the audiogram. Here, an electromechanical signal-transmission model is devised in MATLAB where the parameters of the model convey biological interpretations of mammalian cochlear structures. The model is exploited to simulate the cell-level cochlear pathologies associated with two common types of sensorineural hearing impairments, 1: presbyacusis (age-related hearing impairment) and, 2: noise-induced hearing impairment. Furthermore, a clinical study, consisting of different psychoacoustic and physiological tests, was performed to trace and validate the model predictions in human. The results of the clinical tests were collated and compared with the model predictions, showing a reasonable agreement. In summary, the present model provides a biophysical foundation for simulating the effect of specific cellular lesions, due to different inner-ear diseases and external insults, on the entire cochlear mechanism and thereby on the whole auditory system. This is a multidisciplinary work in the sense that it connects the ‘biological processes’ with ‘acoustic modelling’ and ‘clinical audiology’ in a translational context.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press, 2014. 57 p.
Series
Linköping University Medical Dissertations, ISSN 0345-0082 ; 1400Studies from the Swedish Institute for Disability Research, ISSN 1650-1128 ; 60
Keyword
Auditory modeling, cochlear mechanics, sensorineural hearing impairment, age-related hearing loss, noise-induced hearing loss, inner ear pathologies
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-105810 (URN)10.3384/diss.diva-105810 (DOI)978-91-7519-365-6 (ISBN)
Public defence
2014-04-28, Nils Holger salen, entrance 71, Campus US, Linköpings universitet, Linköping, 13:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2014-04-08 Created: 2014-04-08 Last updated: 2014-10-08Bibliographically approved

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Saremi, AminStenfelt, Stefan

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