liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
ReferencesLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
The placenta in toxicology. Part II: Systemic and local immune adaptations in pregnancy
Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
Covance Laboratories, Muenster, Germany .
Department of Pathology/Section on Comparative Medicine, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina, USA .
Show others and affiliations
2014 (English)In: Toxicologic pathology (Print), ISSN 0192-6233, E-ISSN 1533-1601, Vol. 42, no 2, 327-338 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

During pregnancy, the maternal immune system is challenged by the semiallogeneic fetus, which must be tolerated without compromising fetal or maternal health. This review updates the systemic and local immune changes taking place during human pregnancy, including some examples in rodents. Systemic changes are induced by contact of maternal blood with placental factors and include enhanced innate immunity with increased activation of granulocytes and nonclassical monocytes. Although a bias toward T helper (Th2) and regulatory T cell (Treg) immunity has been associated with healthy pregnancy, the relationship between different circulating Th cell subsets is not straightforward. Instead, these adaptations appear most evidently at the fetal-maternal interface, where for instance Tregs are enriched and promote fetal tolerance. Also innate immune cells, that is, natural killer cells and macrophages, are enriched, constituting the majority of decidual leukocytes. These cells not only contribute to immune regulation but also aid in establishing the placenta by promoting trophoblast recruitment and angiogenesis. Thus, proper interaction between leukocytes and placental trophoblasts is necessary for normal placentation and immune adaptation. Consequently, spontaneous maladaptation or interference of the immune system with toxic substances may be important contributing factors for the development of pregnancy complications such as preeclampsia, preterm labor, and recurrent miscarriages.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2014. Vol. 42, no 2, 327-338 p.
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-108394DOI: 10.1177/0192623313482205ISI: 000337625300004PubMedID: 23531796OAI: diva2:730177
Available from: 2014-06-27 Created: 2014-06-27 Last updated: 2015-03-25Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

fulltext(669 kB)321 downloads
File information
File name FULLTEXT01.pdfFile size 669 kBChecksum SHA-512
Type fulltextMimetype application/pdf

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMed

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Svensson-Arvelund, JuditErnerudh, Jan
By organisation
Division of Inflammation MedicineFaculty of Health SciencesDepartment of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine
In the same journal
Toxicologic pathology (Print)
Medical and Health Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
Total: 321 downloads
The number of downloads is the sum of all downloads of full texts. It may include eg previous versions that are now no longer available

Altmetric score

Total: 92 hits
ReferencesLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link