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Three core activities toward a relevant integrated vulnerability assessment: validate, visualize, and negotiate
Department of Geography, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim, Norway.
Department of Geography, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim, Norway.
Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research . Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
2015 (English)In: Journal of Risk Research, ISSN 1366-9877, E-ISSN 1466-4461, Vol. 18, no 7, 877-895 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Future climate in the Nordic countries is expected to become ‘warmer, wetter, and wilder’, and this will probably cause more extreme weather events. Therefore, local authorities need to improve their ability to assess weather-related hazards such as floods, landslides, and storms, as well as people’s sensitivity and capacity to cope with or adjust to such events. In this article, we present an integrated assessment of vulnerability to natural hazards, which incorporates both exposure and social vulnerability. In our assessment, we screen places and rank them by their relative scores on exposure and vulnerability indices. We also design a web-based visualization tool – ViewExposed – that shows maps that reveal a considerable geographic variation in integrated vulnerability. ViewExposed makes it easy to identify the places with the highest integrated vulnerability, and it facilitates the understanding of the factors that make these places exposed and/or vulnerable. For empirical validation, we correlate the exposure indices with insurance claims due to natural damage. However, we also emphasize the importance of a dialog with relevant stakeholders to ensure a participatory validation. Our top-down exposure and vulnerability assessment benefits from a participatory bottom-up assessment. This is crucial to support decisions about where to implement adaptive and preventive measures against hazards related to climate change.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2015. Vol. 18, no 7, 877-895 p.
Keyword [en]
climate-change adaptation, exposure, integrated vulnerability assessment, geovisualization, participatory GIS
National Category
Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-108398DOI: 10.1080/13669877.2014.923027ISI: 000359792400006OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-108398DiVA: diva2:730187
Projects
NORD-STAR
Funder
Nordic Council of Ministers
Available from: 2014-06-27 Created: 2014-06-27 Last updated: 2017-12-05

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Neset, Tina-Simone

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
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Language
  • de-DE
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  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
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