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Effect of Surgical Technique on Corneal Implant Performance
Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. (Integrative Regenerative Medicine Centre)
Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. (Integrative Regenerative Medicine Centre)
Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. (Integrative Regenerative Medicine Centre)
FibroGen Incorporated, San Francisco, CA, USA.
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2014 (English)In: Translational Vision Science & Technology, ISSN 2164-2591, Vol. 3, no 2, 1-13 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: Our aim was to determine the effect of a surgical technique on biomaterial implant performance, specifically graft retention.

 

Methods: Twelve mini pigs were implanted with cell-free, 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethyl aminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDC)/N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) cross-linked recombinant human collagen type III (RHCIII) hydrogels as substitutes for donor corneal allografts using overlying sutures with or without human amniotic membrane (HAM) versus interrupted sutures with HAM. The effects of the retention method were compared as well as the effects of collagen concentration (13.7% to 15% RHCIII).

Results: All implanted corneas showed initial haze that cleared with time, resulting in corneas with optical clarity matching those of untreated controls. Biochemical analysis showed that by 12 months post operation, the initial RHCIII implants had been completely remodeled, as type I collagen, was the major collagenous protein detected, whereas no RHCIII could be detected. Histological analysis showed all implanted corneas exhibited regeneration of epithelial and stromal layers as well as nerves, along with touch sensitivity and tear production. Most neovascularization was seen in corneas stabilized by interrupted sutures.

Conclusions: This showed that the surgical technique used does have a significant effect on the overall performance of corneal implants, overlying sutures caused less vascularization than interrupted sutures.

Translational Relevance: Understanding the significance of the suturing technique can aid the selection of the most appropriate procedure when implanting artificial corneal substitutes. The same degree of regeneration, despite a higher collagen content indicates that future material development can progress toward stronger, more resistant implants.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology , 2014. Vol. 3, no 2, 1-13 p.
Keyword [en]
biosynthetic cornea; corneal regeneration; biomaterials; recombinant human collagen; corneal transplantation
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences Biomaterials Science Ophthalmology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-108585DOI: 10.1167/tvst.3.2.6PubMedID: 24749003OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-108585DiVA: diva2:731122
Available from: 2014-06-30 Created: 2014-06-30 Last updated: 2015-08-10Bibliographically approved

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Kozak Ljunggren, MonikaEdin, JoelSalerud, GöranFagerholm, PerGriffith, May

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Kozak Ljunggren, MonikaEdin, JoelSalerud, GöranFagerholm, PerGriffith, May
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Division of Cell BiologyFaculty of Health SciencesDepartment of Clinical and Experimental MedicineBiomedical InstrumentationThe Institute of TechnologyDivision of NeuroscienceDepartment of Ophthalmology in Linköping
Medical and Health SciencesBiomaterials ScienceOphthalmology

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