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The effect of sexual harassment on lethal mutation rate in female Drosophila melanogaster
Department of Animal Ecology, Evolutionary Biology Centre, Uppsala University, Sweden. (Ageing Research Group)
Department of Evolutionary Biology, Evolutionary Biology Centre, Uppsala, Sweden. (Ageing Research Group)
Department of Animal Ecology, Evolutionary Biology Centre, Uppsala University, Sweden. (Ageing Research Group)ORCID iD: 0000-0003-4352-6275
Department of Evolutionary Biology, Evolutionary Biology Centre, Uppsala, Sweden.
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2013 (English)In: Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Biological Sciences, ISSN 0962-8452, E-ISSN 1471-2954, Vol. 280, no 1750Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The rate by which new mutations are introduced into a population may have far-reaching implications for processes at the population level. Theory assumes that all individuals within a population have the same mutation rate, but this assumption may not be true. Compared with individuals in high condition, those in poor condition may have fewer resources available to invest in DNA repair, resulting in elevated mutation rates. Alternatively, environmentally induced stress can result in increased investment in DNA repair at the expense of reproduction. Here, we directly test whether sexual harassment by males, known to reduce female condition, affects female capacity to alleviate DNA damage in Drosophila melanogaster fruitflies. Female gametes can repair double-strand DNA breaks in sperm, which allows manipulating mutation rate independently from female condition. We show that male harassment strongly not only reduces female fecundity, but also reduces the yield of dominant lethal mutations, supporting the hypothesis that stressed organisms invest relatively more in repair mechanisms. We discuss our results in the light of previous research and suggest that social effects such as density and courtship can play an important and underappreciated role in mediating condition-dependent mutation rate.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London, UK: Royal Society , 2013. Vol. 280, no 1750
Keyword [en]
hormesis, mutation rate, sexual conflict, sexual selection
National Category
Evolutionary Biology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-111367DOI: 10.1098/rspb.2012.1874ISI: 000311943100004PubMedID: 23173200OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-111367DiVA: diva2:755910
Available from: 2014-10-15 Created: 2014-10-15 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved

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Løvlie, HanneFriberg, Urban

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