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Farm-scale adaptation under extreme climate and rapid economic transition
Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research . Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research . Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-5500-3300
Sveriges Meteorologiska och Hydrologiska Institut, Norrköping, Sweden .
Agricultural College, Shihezi University, China.
2015 (English)In: Environment, Development and Sustainability, ISSN 1387-585X, E-ISSN 1573-2975, Vol. 17, no 3, 393-407 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper aims to analyse what shapes farmers’ vulnerability and adaptation strategies in the context of rapid change. Xinjiang is semi-arid, with extremes of temperature, growing seasons and winds. Favourable socioeconomic conditions have boosted the wellbeing of farmers in the past decades. Interviews with forty-seven farmers led to the categorization of five groups according to the predominant type of farming activity: animal farmers, government farmers (leasing land from the Xinjiang Production and Construction Group), crop farmers, agri-tourism operators and entrepreneurs. High government support has aided farmers to deal with climate challenges, through advanced technology, subsidies and loans. Farmers, however, greatly contribute to their own high adaptive capacity through inventiveness, flexibility and a high knowledge base. Although the future climate will entail hotter temperatures, farmers can be seen as generally well equipped to deal with these challenges because of the high adaptive capacity they currently have and utilize. Those that are most vulnerable are those that have difficulty to access credit e.g. animal farmers and those that do not want to change their agricultural systems e.g. from pastoral lifestyles to include tourism-based operations.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Netherlands, 2015. Vol. 17, no 3, 393-407 p.
Keyword [en]
Climate change, Farm-level adaptation, Multiple stressors, Agriculture, China, Planning strategies
National Category
Climate Research Environmental Sciences Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-112683DOI: 10.1007/s10668-014-9549-2ISI: 000354481200002OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-112683DiVA: diva2:769411
Projects
SIDA Water Resources Vulnerability
Available from: 2014-12-08 Created: 2014-12-08 Last updated: 2017-12-05

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Wilk, JulieHjerpe, Mattias

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