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Shoulder Pain and Dysfunction in Young Surf Lifesavers
Bond Institute of Health and Sport, Faculty of Health Science and Medicine, Bond University, Australia.
Surflife Physio, Miami, Australia.
Bond Institute of Health and Sport, Faculty of Health Science and Medicine, Bond University, Australia / Division of Physiotherapy, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden / Department of Physiotherapy, Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-4318-9216
2015 (English)In: Physical Therapy in Sport, ISSN 1466-853X, E-ISSN 1873-1600, Vol. 16, no 2, 162-168 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives

To determine the incidence and prevalence of significantly interrupting shoulder pain (SIP) in young surf lifesavers and to determine association with training dosage and the ‘combined elevation test’.

Participants

54 surf lifesavers aged 10 – 18 from the Gold Coast, Australia.

Methods and Outcome Measures

Retrospective survey of SIP and training dosage. Cross-sectional measures of the combined elevation test.

Design

Retrospective.

Results

56.5% of female surf lifesavers reported a history of SIP compared to males with 48.5%. Females had a higher combined elevation score compared to males, 28.32±SD8.52cm and 26.09±SD6.64cm, respectively. Young surf lifesavers had an incidence rate of 2.1 SIP episodes per thousand hours of training, an incidence proportion of 51.9% and prevalence of 18.5%. Combined elevation had low level positive trends with training dosages and statistically significant negative correlation with board paddling sessions per week (r= -0.287, p=<0.05). Those with a history of SIP had a statistically significant higher number of sessions (p=0.008), duration (p=0.015) and distance (p=0.005) swimming per week.

Conclusion

Young surf lifesavers with a history of SIP have greater swimming dosage not associated with decrease in combined elevation score. More board paddling sessions per week decreased the combined elevation score of young surf lifesavers.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2015. Vol. 16, no 2, 162-168 p.
Keyword [en]
Training dosage, Swimming, Injury prevention
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-113861DOI: 10.1016/j.ptsp.2014.10.004ISI: 000355026600012PubMedID: 25702625Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84928585164OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-113861DiVA: diva2:785175
Available from: 2015-02-02 Created: 2015-02-02 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved

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Abbott, Allan

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