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NMR as a Noninvasive Tool in Meat Research
Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Division of Biochemistry, University of Calgary, Calgary, Canada.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-8661-2232
Division of Biochemistry, University of Calgary, Calgary, Canada.
1987 (English)In: Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, ISSN 0077-8923, E-ISSN 1749-6632, Vol. 508, 516-522 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

NMR has been used for some time for in vivo measurements of biological tissues and has established itself as a valuable and complementary method to be used in parallel with traditional extraction methods. To date most attention has been paid to problems such as central biochemical pathways, energy metabolism in simple organisms and organs, and of course to problems encountered in medicine. There has been relative little interest in applying NMR to problems in food technology, even if these questions can have a tremendous impact on everyday life. Following a suggestion by Gadian,' we show here that multinuclear metabolic NMR is a useful method for studying post-mortem events in carcasses of slaughtered animals.

The treatment and storage of carcasses during the first hours after slaughter is of extreme importance for the final quality and tenderness of the meat. Mistreatment can cause large economical losses and waste of valuable food. For example, in order to reduce the risk of bacterial infections one would like to cool down a carcass as soon as possible. Nevertheless, if a muscle is cooled down below 15OC before the postmortem metabolism is completed it may shorten dramatically thus decreasing the tenderness of the meat.' Therefore it is important to measure the rates of postmortem metabolism and to study the efficiency of methods that are aimed at speeding up this process.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 1987. Vol. 508, 516-522 p.
National Category
Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Medical Imaging
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-114175DOI: 10.1111/j.1749-6632.1987.tb32954.xOAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-114175DiVA: diva2:787626
Available from: 2015-02-11 Created: 2015-02-11 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved

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Lundberg, Peter

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Division of Radiological SciencesFaculty of Health SciencesCenter for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV)Department of Radiation Physics
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Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Medical Imaging

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