liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Adaptation spinoffs from technological and socio-economic changes
Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research.
Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-5500-3300
Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. School of Planning and Media Design, Blekinge Institute of Technology, Sweden.
2015 (English)In: Climate Change Adaptation and Development: Transforming Paradigms and Practices / [ed] Tor Håkon Inderberg, Siri Eriksen, Karen O'Brien & Linda Sygna, London and New York: Routledge, 2015, 161-177 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Studies have shown that societal change related to economic growth and development policies can affect the adaptive capacity of communities to a multitude of stressors including climate variability and change. Concerns have recently been raised about the consequences of climate mitigation and adaptation on vulnerable groups and the impacts of large-scale globalization processes on the adaptive capacities of local communities. This chapter addresses how side effects of technological and socioeconomic changes, which we refer to as spinoffs have potential to strengthen climate adaptation strategies. The spinoff examples fall under a two-dimensional framework according to whether they arise from orchestrated or opportunity-driven initiatives and technological or socio-economic changes. Three cases in developing countries undergoing rapid economic growth have been chosen as examples of different types of spinoffs and how they can positively influence climate adaptation and more particularly adaptive capacity. They are: information and communication technology (ICT) in South Africa, changing lifestyles in China and empowerment in India. The cases illustrate that new objects, inventions and trends constantly emerge which have potential to help people improve their livelihoods in ways that can be climate smart. People working as development workers and policy makers need to be observant and engage in open-minded dialogue with communities in order to recognize emergent technologies, lifestyles and trends to facilitate the use and development of on-going or potential spinoffs that positively affect adaptation to climate change.

Abstract [sv]

Olika studier har visat att samhällsförändringar kopplade till ekonomiskt tillväxt eller policy-utveckling kan påverka lokalbefolkningens förmåga att anpassa sig till klimatförändringar och -variation. Många risker och negativa konsekvenser har diskuterats. Detta kapitel lyfter fram hur sidoeffekter av teknologiska eller samhällsförändringar, så kallade spinoff-effekter, kan ha positiv påverkan på anpassningsförmågan i lokalsamhället. Tre exempel ges i kapitlet. Spinoff-effekterna analyseras mot bakgrund av om förändringarna är planerade eller spontana, och om de gäller teknologiska eller socioekonmiska förändringar. Det första exemplet, spontan teknologisk utveckling, handlar om hur IT i Sydafrika kan användas för att skapa nätverk som motverkar skogsbränder vid torka. Det andra, spontan socioekonomisk förändring, handlar om hur efterfrågan på lokal turism och ekologiska livsmedel på landsbygden i Kina har bidragit till differentiering av försörjningen och ökat lantbrukarnas inkomster. Det tredje, planerad socioeknomisk förändring, handlar om hur stärkta kvinnogrupper i Indien lättare hanterar vattenförsörjning och tar ökat ledarskap. Dessa exempel vill visa för utvecklingsarbetare och politiker att det är viktigt att vara uppmärksam på, och föra en öppen dialog med lokalsamhällen för att få syn på hur ny teknologi, livsstilsförändringar och trender kan samverka och nyttjas i arbetetet med klimatanpassning.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London and New York: Routledge, 2015. 161-177 p.
Keyword [en]
Climate change, development, adaptation
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary Climate Research
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-114337ISBN: 978-1-138-02596-7 (print)ISBN: 978-1-138-02598-1 (print)ISBN: 978-1-315-77465-7 (print)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-114337DiVA: diva2:789402
Note

Contents

1. Development as Usual is not Enough Siri Eriksen, Tor Håkon Inderberg, Karen O’Brien and Linda Sygna 2. Building Adaptive Capacity in the Informal Settlements of Maputo: Lessons for Development from a Resilience Perspective Jon Ensor, Emily Boyd, Sirrku Juhola, and Castan Broto 3. The Societal Role of Charcoal Production in Climate Change Adaptation of the Arid and Semi-Arid Lands (ASALs) of Kenya Caroline Ochieng, Sirkku Juhola, and Francis X. Johnson 4. Adaptive Capacity: From coping to sustainable transformation Christine Wamsler and Ebba Brink 5. Gender Matters: Adaptive capacities to climate variability and change in the Lake Victoria Basin Sara Gabrielsson 6. Adaptation Technologies as Drivers of Social Development Sara Trærup and Lars Christiansen 7. Multilevel Governance and Coproduction in Urban Flood-risk Management: The case of Dar es Salaam Trond Vedeld, Wilbard Kombe, Clara Kweka Msale, and Siri Bjerkreim Hellevik 8. Can Linking Small- and Large-scale Farmers Enhance Adaptive Capacity? Evidence from Tanzania’s Southern Agricultural Growth Corridor Jennifer West 9. Adaptation Spinoffs from Technological and Socio-economic Changes Julie Wilk, Mattias Hjerpe and Birgitte Rydhagen 10. Sustainable Adaptation under Adverse Development? Lessons from Ethiopia Siri H. Eriksen and Andrei Marin 11. The Role of Local Power Relations in the Vulnerability of Households to Climate Change in Humla, Nepal Sigrid Nagoda and Siri H. Eriksen 12. A Socionature Approach to Adaptation: Political transition, intersectionality, and climate change programmes in Nepal Andrea Nightingale 13. Influencing Policy and Action on Climate Change Adaptation: Strategic stakeholder engagement in the agricultural sector in Tanzania.Kassim Kulindwa and Baruani Mshale 14. Limited Room for Manoeuvre: Indigenous Peoples and Climate Change Adaptation Strategies Jacob Kronik and Jennifer Hays 15. Adaptation to Climate Change through Transformation Karen O’Brien, Siri Eriksen, Tor Håkon Inderberg and Linda Sygna

Available from: 2015-02-18 Created: 2015-02-18 Last updated: 2016-06-15Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Find book at a Swedish library/Hitta boken i ett svenskt bibliotek

Authority records BETA

Wilk, JulieHjerpe, MattiasRydhagen, Birgitta

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Wilk, JulieHjerpe, MattiasRydhagen, Birgitta
By organisation
Tema Environmental ChangeFaculty of Arts and SciencesCentre for Climate Science and Policy ResearchDepartment of Thematic Studies
Social Sciences InterdisciplinaryClimate Research

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

isbn
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

isbn
urn-nbn
Total: 202 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf