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Nuclear magnetic resonance studies of cellular metabolism
Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Department of Biological Sciences, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-8661-2232
Department of Biological Sciences, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada.
Department of Biological Sciences, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada.
Department of Biological Sciences, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada.
1990 (English)In: Analytical Biochemistry, ISSN 0003-2697, E-ISSN 1096-0309, Vol. 191, no 2, 193-222 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy was described in 1946 (1,2), initially as a method that had appeal only for nuclear physicists who used it to accurately determine nuclear magnetic moments. Thissituation changed rapidly, however, when it was demonstrated that the NMR frequency for the same nucleus in different chemical compounds was different (3). For example, two separate signals are observed in a 14N NMR spectrum of a solution of NH,NO,, representing the NH: and NO; ions, respectively (4). Since individual atoms within one molecule also give rise to resolved signals (5) it became clear that the NMR technique held great analytical potential, in particular since the spectra can be recorded in such a way that the area under a signal is directly proportional to its concentration. Such phenomena and various theoretical aspects of NMR are currently quite well understood (6,7). Because of these features NMR has become the foremost spectroscopic method for the analysis of all sorts of chemical compounds.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
1990. Vol. 191, no 2, 193-222 p.
Keyword [en]
Animals, Cells/*metabolism, Humans, *Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy
National Category
Physical Chemistry
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-114165DOI: 10.1016/0003-2697(90)90210-ZOAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-114165DiVA: diva2:790754
Note

0003-2697 (Print) Journal Article Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't Review

Available from: 2015-02-25 Created: 2015-02-11 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved

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Lundberg, Peter

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Division of Radiological SciencesFaculty of Health SciencesCenter for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV)Department of Radiation Physics
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