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Bringing governmentality to the study of global climate governance
Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research.
Lunds universitet.
2014 (English)In: Governing the climate: new approaches to rationality, power and politics / [ed] Johannes Stripple, Harriet Bulkeley, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press , 2014, 1, 27-41 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Since the 1990s when global governance emerged as a new and powerful research agenda, scholars have sought to understand the changing role of the state in a time of globalization (Rosenau and Czempiel 1992; Cerny 2010). By drawing attention to the rise of hybrid, nonhierarchical and network-like modes of governing on the global stage, global governance studies have taught us that the state is no longer the sole, or even the principal, source of authority in the international system. As nonstate actors have taken on an increasing number of governance functions in world politics, the sources and institutional locus of authority have changed (Cutler, Haufler and Porter 1999; Hall and Biersteker 2002). The field of global climate governance is no exception. In a time when United Nations (UN) negotiations on a future climate deal have lost momentum, students of international relations have turned their attention to the multiple ways transnational actors and networks such as environmental nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) (Wapner 1996; Betsill and Corell 2008), corporations (Levy and Egan 2003; Newell and Paterson 2010) and city networks (Bulkeley and Betsill 2003) contribute to public rule-setting and steering. Rather than approaching the state as the only actor with purpose and power, the growing field of climate governance studies has sought to establish a broader conception of politics that captures the richness and complexity of climate governance ‘beyond the international regime’ (Okereke, Bulkeley and Schroeder 2009; Bernstein et al. 2010; Hoffmann 2011).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cambridge: Cambridge University Press , 2014, 1. 27-41 p.
National Category
Political Science (excluding Public Administration Studies and Globalization Studies)
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-114820ISBN: 9781107046269 (print)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-114820DiVA: diva2:792621
Available from: 2015-03-04 Created: 2015-03-04 Last updated: 2016-06-15Bibliographically approved

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Lövbrand, Eva

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Tema Environmental ChangeFaculty of Arts and SciencesCentre for Climate Science and Policy Research
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