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Training Literacy Skills through Sign Language
Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. (Linnaeus Centre HEAD)
Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. (Linnaeus Centre HEAD)
Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-5025-9975
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2014 (English)In: Deafness and Education International, ISSN 1464-3154, E-ISSN 1557-069X, Vol. 17, no 1, 8-18 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The literacy skills of deaf children generally lag behind those of their hearing peers. The mechanisms of reading in deaf individuals are only just beginning to be unraveled but it seems that native language skills play an important role. In this study 12 deaf pupils (six in grades 1?2 and six in grades 4?6) at a Swedish state primary school for deaf and hard of hearing children were trained on the connection between Swedish Sign Language and written Swedish using a pilot sign language version of the literacy training software program Omega-is. Literacy skills improved substantially across the 20 days of the study. These literacy gains may have rested upon the specific software-based intervention, upon regular classroom activities, or upon a combination of these factors. Omega-is-d, and similar software utilizing sign language as a component, targets an important mechanism supporting reading development in deaf children and could play an important role in bilingual education refinements.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Maney Publishing, 2014. Vol. 17, no 1, 8-18 p.
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Other Social Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-114859DOI: 10.1179/1557069X14Y.0000000037OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-114859DiVA: diva2:792813
Available from: 2015-03-05 Created: 2015-03-05 Last updated: 2017-12-04

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Rudner, MaryAndin, JosefineRönnberg, JerkerHeimann, Mikael

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Rudner, MaryAndin, JosefineRönnberg, JerkerHeimann, Mikael
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Disability ResearchFaculty of Arts and SciencesThe Swedish Institute for Disability ResearchDepartment of Behavioural Sciences and Learning
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Deafness and Education International
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