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A burning desire for smoke? Sampling insects favoured by forestfire in the absence of fire
Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-6128-1051
Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
Department of Wildlife, Fish and Environmental Studies, SLU, 901 83 Umea°, Sweden.
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2015 (English)In: Journal of Insect Conservation, ISSN 1366-638X, E-ISSN 1572-9753, Vol. 19, no 1, 55-65 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Fire-favoured insects are difficult to sampleexcept opportunistically after forest fires. Here, we tested ifsmoke from a small fire could be an efficient way to samplesuch insects. Insects were sampled over ca. 10 h hours, byhand-picking and netting on screens put up around the fire.Two specimens of the rare and redlisted Hormopeza spp.(Diptera, Empididae) were caught. Large numbers([20,000) of Microsania spp. (Diptera, Platypezidae) werecaught, but none in the absence of smoke. The numbers ofMicrosania spp. clearly peaked in late afternoon, and ashort sampling period would be sufficient if targeting onlythis taxon. Of the almost 200 species of Coleoptera, 17 %were considered as fire-favoured, contributing 9 % of thespecimens, suggesting low efficiency of the method for thisgroup. Using 23 sites differing in fire history, catches ofMicrosania spp. were unaffected by numbers and area offorest fire (preceding 5 years and within 10 km radius overthe sampling sites). In contrast, there was a weak trend forthe proportion of fire-favoured Coleoptera to increase withincreasing number of fires. To conclude, smoke as producedin our study can clearly attract fire-favoured Diptera,but smoke had only a weak effect on fire-favoured Coleopterain the study area. It is still likely that selectivelypicking specimens of species attracted to smoke is a morecost-efficient method than using, e.g., Malaise traps thatcatch indiscriminately.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2015. Vol. 19, no 1, 55-65 p.
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Natural Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-115293DOI: 10.1007/s10841-014-9742-5ISI: 000350887700006OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-115293DiVA: diva2:794693
Available from: 2015-03-12 Created: 2015-03-12 Last updated: 2017-12-04

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Milberg, PerBergman, Karl-OlofWesterberg, LarsJansson, Nicklas

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